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The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

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Poppy

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Saw the finale and thought it was well done.  I'll comment on that later.





This is so sweet of Darren.  From dcriss-archive:
















Episode 8 (second to last episode)
Spoiler:

-I thought the episode was really well done.  Matt as the director, and the actors all did so well!

-- As Tom Rob Smith and Ryan Murphy said in various interviews, season 2 of ACS really places a focus on the victims, those who were killed by Andrew Cunanan:  Jeff Trail, David Madson, Lee Miglin, William Reese, and Gianni Versace.  Both Matt Bomer and Ryan Murphy, in interviews, raise how Episode 8 clearly shows that Andrew and his family were also victims--of the male head of their family, Modesto Cunanan. It's very clear that the erratic, temperamental Modesto abuses his wife Mary Anne.  He physically assaults her several times and also commits psychological attacks of her self-esteem, calling her mind weak and demonizing her for having had depression.   Modesto also is suggested by the show to have sexually abused Andrew when he was a child.  It dawns on the audience members that the reason (and i think Ryan addresses this in his interview) that Modesto gave Andrew the master bedroom is so that Modesto can dress and undress in Andrew's room, since Andrew's room presumably has the largest closet, in privacy, away from the rest of the family members.  And there's that scene, where Modesto tells Andrew a story, about a time when Andrew burned his foot as toddler, with Modesto claiming baby Andrew made no sound when Modesto kissed the pain away.  Then the scene fades to gray as Modesto menacingly looms over young Andrew, laying very still, with Modesto repeating, "not a sound."  

--I thought the episode was very sad, showing how this family was destroyed by the overwhelmingly corrupt (and corrupting) and psychologically damaging presence of this domineering father figure, Modesto, who terrorized Andrew's mother, and most likely Andrew and his siblings.  He inflicted physical and/or emotional abuse on his family.  He also caused the family to become bankrupt and abandoned them, stealing from their own bank accounts and selling  the house without the family's knowledge, unconcerned about what hardships this caused his own family, all so that he had the funds to flee to and live in the Philippines. 

--In words and in deeds, Modesto also in effect molded the attitudes and philosophies of young Andrew in some warped way, stressing that success was defined as obtaining money. Period.  Modesto failed to teach Andrew the importance of attaining money through hard work, versus through illegal means that victimized innocent people.  (Later in the episode, when Andrew confronts his father in the Philippines, Andrew does not ask Modesto if he broke the law, or if Modesto stole the money of his clients.  Andrew merely wanted to assess whether there was any money, or whether they really were penniless.)

--The word "special" was used often in this episode.  Modesto had persistently preached to Andrew that if he felt "special," then success would follow (versus how Gianni Versace was taught by his mother that his dreams must come from his heart, that he must work hard to achieve his dreams, and that this was acceptable because it meant his dreams were "special").   It was suggested that Andrew managed to win admission into a highly sought after and prestigious private school because Andrew answered the administration's question of what was the one wish Andrew really desired, and Andrew stated it was to feel "special."   Andrew as a child, at first did try to work hard, to earn any title of "special," by doing his homework carefully and diligently, with his mother's support and urging.  His mother believed that gaining admission into the private school was only a beginning, not an ending, that  he still must earn success by working hard.  But Andrew's father successfully alienated Andrew from his mother.   Modesto confides in Andrew in the car that he feels that only Andrew is special, not Andrew's siblings.  (We also see Andrew attempting to stand out as special by taking his yearbook picture with his shirt open.  He is voted most likely to be remembered.  Even the quote he chose in the yearbook is intended by Andrew to make him noticed, something to the effect of, "after me, destruction," (which the audience realizes later turns out to be true when Andrew conducts a killing spree).  Modesto fails to sell stock at Merrill Lynch, because he persists on using a pitch to sell risky stocks that potential clients reject, which is whether they (the clients) rather be comfortable or "exceptional" in what stocks they choose.

--It's interesting that Modesto had managed to cause Andrew to feel alienated from his mother and Andrew's siblings (by putting Andrew alone in the large master bedroom, by making Andrew's siblings resent Andrew, by convincing Andrew his mother failed Andrew as a baby and often insulting Andrew's mother as having a weak mind).  In other episodes, we often hear how Andrew prefers the company of older people.  As a young child, Andrew did not feel accepted by his siblings, and that feeling of alienation continued throughout his life.  I like the scene in high school, where after Andrew is dumped by his older "boyfriend,"   Andrew dances alone at a party, in a frenzied way, with Andrew growing distressed when he sees everyone continuing to stand away from him and stare at him dancing alone.  Lizzie, an older, married woman, feels compassion and joins Andrew, and they make a connection as two lonely and rebellious spirits.  (Creepy foreshadowing when Lizzie asks Andrew what he wants to do after graduating from high school, and Andrew answers that he wants to seek out his idols, mentioning Versace.)

--  Modesto spoiled Andrew by treating him  like a little prince, as his siblings derisively called Andrew, with Andrew--unlike his siblings-- not required to help pack or unpack when the family moved, with Andrew receiving a car before he could even drive (when his older siblings who were driving age didn't have a car), as well as Andrew receiving the master bedroom, having his father kneel down on the floor and kiss Andrew's feet when Andrew was accepted into the exclusive private school, with his father worshiping Andrew in an unnatural and unhealthy manner.  By spoiling Andrew, and not encouraging Andrew to attain achievement through hard work, Andrew grew up feeling entitled to success, which included feeling entitled to wealth and status.

--It's so creepy how Modesto treated Andrew, when Andrew was only a child, almost like a substitute spouse of and a best friend for Modesto, with Modesto confiding in Andrew, being affectionate with Andrew, lavishing  his attention on Andrew, praising Andrew, worshiping Andrew, partially sharing a master bedroom with Andrew, feeling supported by and understood by Andrew, as if Andrew was a mature adult in a close emotional relationship with Modesto, instead of just a child who was his son.  The pressure Modesto placed on Andrew was inappropriate, psychologically harmful and damaging to Andrew's mental state of mind (not to mention the psychological damage that resulted from Andrew growing up where his father's physical and emotional abuse of his wife was just an accepted way of life).  Instead of comforting Andrew that he would be loved unconditionally, even if he was not accepted by that exclusive private school, Modesto exclaims that the family relocated so that Andrew could be closer to that school.  Not surprisingly, Andrew cried with great relief when he was accepted into the school, with  Modesto kissing the feet of young Andrew.  (So dysfunctional, scary and creepy.)

--The acting was wonderful.  Count me in as a new fan of Jon Jon Briones, who inhabited the role of Modesto Cunanan so seamlessly, so skillfully.  He became Modesto Cunanan.  Jon Jon was so good at being incredibly scary, creepy, and sleazy.  He was so good at demonstrating how easily Modesto could turn on the charm in his interview with Merrill Lynch, but you also saw what a corrupt snake he was, as well as how unempathetic, inhumane, and unethical he was in defrauding elderly people of their only savings.  Jon Jon also was so good at showing how scary Modesto was, when he played mind games with Mary Anne, by first pretending that he sadly didn't get the Merrill Lynch job, then snarling in rage when Mary Anne believed him.   The audience understood why Andrew could quickly switch between extreme moods, based on the fact that Andrew had years of witnessing the erratic, terrifying behavior of his father.   And we also could guess who taught Andrew to be cruel psychologically, how to manipulate other people using the tools of fear and humiliation (the threat of "disgrace," which was used by Andrew against both David Madson and Lee Miglin), as well as ingraining in Andrew that it was acceptable to be violent to others who were perceived to disobey you or wrong you. 

--Darren has this skill  of using his facial expressions, his body language, and the way he delivers his lines to change his age.  He believably portrayed Andrew as a teenager.  I felt bad for Andrew in so many ways, the pressure that was unreasonably placed on him as a child, the sexual abuse that was suggested that he suffered from his father (and as an altar boy?), the abuse of his mother that he grew up with, the alienation that he felt within his own family in his own home, and how being gay contributed to that alienation in his high school, the disgrace (an important word in this show) of his family becoming suddenly destitute  and of his father being a fugitive from the law, with Andrew left alone to suddenly provide for his dependent mother, who was afflicted with some type of mental illness. 

--I loved Darren's and Jon Jon's acting in a scene where Andrew and Modesto were arguing by a table in Modesto's house in the Philippines.   Andrew accuses his father of lying about being in a book of 500 top investors (or was it bankers?  I forget the title of the book that Modesto claimed to be in, but which Andrew discovers does not exist).  In that scene, Andrew--full of anger at and disgust of his father--confronts Modesto that Andrew's father is a liar.    Andrew starts quietly crying.  Modesto starts his mental attacks, striking at Andrew psychologically, calling Andrew weak, like Andrew's mother.   Modesto is angry, that Andrew would judge him, Modesto.  Modesto screams that he (Modesto) is the one who is ashamed--of Andrew, of his "sissy" boy with a "sissy" mind (a reference to Andrew being gay),  and spits at  Andrew's face, calling Andrew his "special sissy boy" (there's that word again, "special").  After Modesto slaps Andrews face, Andrew grabs the knife in anger, but is unable to hurt his father.  Modesto taunts him by saying to Andrew, to be a man for once, that Andrew doesn't have it in him, while Andrew cowers (in fear of his father's violence? In Andrew's fear of the possible escalation of violence? ).   (Again, Modesto is ingraining in Andrew that being a "man" means being able to assert one's dominance through violence.  Modesto's words, that Andrew doesn't have it in him to be violent, is ironic, since the audience knows that Andrew later does kill five men.)   Because of the heightened emotions he is feeling from this confrontation with his father, finally realizing that there are no funds, that he's on his own, that his father betrayed him through Modesto's lies and stealing, and because of his father's psychological attacks of Andrew being gay, Andrew bursts into tears.  Andrew exclaims, "I'll never be like you" (alluding to an earlier statement by Andrew, that his father is a liar and a thief).  This scene at the table in Modesto's house in the Philippines was so well acted by both Darren and Jon Jon. Darren portrayed so many different emotions that Andrew felt:  Anger, hurt, despair, and Andrew's final acceptance of his state of being destitute and of his father's betrayal.  And Jon Jon is just so good at again portraying Modesto as smart, but cruel, vicious, violent, and never accepting responsibility for his own actions.

--Another example of institutionalized homophobia was presented in this episode.  In this episode, we saw instances of homophobic insults hurled at both Gianni and Andrew in their respective schools.  In Gianni's case, as a young boy, another student called him a "pansy," with the teacher appearing to be silently agreeing, not reprimanding the student who made the homophobic insult.  In Andrew's case, as a teenager in high school, another student calls  him a "fag" during the taking of profile pics for the yearbook at the school, where I would presume there would be present at least a teacher, although it is not entirely clear if a teacher was present.

--I like that the writer and the director also refer to the American Dream (hence Modesto raising the American flag, while Andrew watches).  The American Dream symbolizes the possibilities of achieving success through equal opportunities offered to all, and through hard work.    Modesto faced unfair odds as an immigrant who came to the U.S. with little educational pedigree, with little wealth, as a person of color competing against highly educated white men from Ivy League colleges, who clearly appeared to fit in better than Modesto.  Modesto further had hit road blocks because prospective clients sensed how misleading and financially dangerous were the risky stocks pitched by Modesto.  To Modesto, the American Dream meant attaining wealth without hard work.  Modesto sought to achieve the American Dream by lying and stealing his way to success.  Andrew followed his father's example, by lying and using  his charm--not by working hard--in his attempt to achieve the American Dream.  Modesto also tried to ingrain in Andrew the need to succeed in America by fitting in, by assimilating (forcing Andrew to read a large book about appropriate American behavior).  It's interesting that Modesto served in the Navy, like Jeff Trail, but unlike Jeff, Modesto does not believe in serving his country with integrity and honesty, with the code of honor that Jeff Trail lived his life.  In a scene that took place with Modesto in the Philippines, Modesto stated that the American Dream is a myth, that the American Dream of immigrants coming to America from nothing and achieving success is a lie.


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Last edited by Poppy on Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:53 pm; edited 2 times in total


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Poppy

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From dcriss-archive:


I love everything about this statement that Darren released!   heart heart heart I love that he leads with a message about the social significance of this show, with ACS Versace shining a light on the issue of the human costs of institutionalized homophobia (in the Navy, in law enforcement, and as we saw in Episode 8, also in schools).  Especially love this part of his statement, ". . . my hope is that our show has brought a voice to many of the injustices that had, until now, lived mostly  in the shadows.  My prayer remains that with all the darkness we explored, that we created some kind of light- by igniting discussion and encouraging larger questions about ourselves and the society we live in."  Very eloquently said!  Bravo, Darren!    I also love that Darren thanked and congratulated everyone connected to the show, not just the actors, but the directors, writers, crew and production team.  l love his sincere, heartfelt thank you to Ryan Murphy for this great opportunity, for Ryan's faith in and support of Darren.  :cry  Aw, he also thanks his fans.  I know Darren made many new fans who admired his acting in this show, including my husband's co-worker who loved Darren's acting in Versace, who also feels connected with him because she also is proud of being Filipino.













Didn't get a chance to post these tweets from Darren late last night (early morning today).   :happy face Aw, I love how sentimental and meditative he is being in the last part, reflecting on being a teenager who was dreaming of being a professional actor in his 30s, . . . and now here he is in the present day, in his 30s, having finished watching the product of his hard work as a professional actor in ACS Versace, an admirable, socially-conscious work of art.  And I completely agree with him, that comedies and rom-coms are full of under-appreciated performances by actors (yes, namely women).  I so agree that these shows are full of joy, charm and brimming with heart.  I'm thinking about shows like "Little Miss Sunshine," and "Four Weddings and A Funeral,"  "Juno." Maybe someday, Darren will have the opportunity to be in a film like these.  I hope so. 


















heart heart heart










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Poppy

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Interviews and other articles about "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"


From Darren Criss Army:


It's so lovely that Ryan gave Darren and all the actors in Versace such a great opportunity. 
I can imagine how rewarding it is for Ryan to have the chance to give these wonderful career-defining opportunities to people he has faith in.  heart    "One of the crimes was apathy . . ."  Yes, I'm glad he felt so strongly about this issue that he brought this story to our screens.

Entertainment Weekly wrote:
Assassination of Gianni Versace: Ryan Murphy on the finale and the next American Crime Story

March 21, 2018

EW talked to executive producer Ryan Murphy about the finale, Criss’ revelatory performance, and whether Katrina is still planned as the next installment in FX’s critically acclaimed American Crime Story franchise.

[. . . ]

Max Greenfield’s scene in the interrogation room at the police station feels like the thesis for Versace, in that homophobia was so much of the reason the police didn’t pursue Cunanan.
Yes, and also Marilyn Miglin [played by Judith Light] has a big monologue about family. So yes, but I think the reason I was interested in doing it initially and was drawn to it initially was because one of the crimes was apathy. Here was this manhunt, and it’s true that in Miami a lot of the police officers would not go into gay bars to put up the most-wanted posters because they thought people would think they were gay. So by pure apathy and being dismissed as, “Well, he’s taking out gay people, who cares!” that’s one of the reasons he ultimately had such a high body count — because people just didn’t care, particularly law enforcement.

[. . . ]

So much of the houseboat stuff feels like a hallucination by Andrew. Was that something you were going for?
Yeah we did. Of course nobody can really know what happened in there other than a lot of physical evidence he left behind, like what he ate and what he watched. What I thought was so crazy about that houseboat was that there was a TV in every room and Andrew had found this television projector, so that was something that was really there. So he kind of did have TVs going in every room. At that point, Cunanan was on crystal meth and coming down off the drug in very painful withdrawal, and he had no food. The last couple days of his life were very fraught.

Darren really leaves everything on the table for this role, even shaving his head. You were his biggest champion for this — how do you feel about his performance?

I am proud of him and I always knew he could do it and I think he proved he could do it. I was very adamant about his casting. I thought there was a great dramatic actor inside there waiting to come out. He took his responsibilities very seriously, and that’s the best thing I can ever do having the gig I have, is believing in people and giving the opportunities for them to shine. I do think it’s the best performance of the year, and I think it’s the hardest. It’s a nine-hour descent into madness.

[ . . . ]

I haven’t talked to you since the Netflix deal. How do you feel about this?
I’m really excited. I’m really excited to do something else. I’m excited to explore new worlds and do all different types of programming and make documentaries. I’m also really excited about the shows I have with Fox, two of those are my Netflix shows, Ratched and The Politician. At least for the near foreseeable future, nothing has changed. It’s business as usual and I’m still there, and we’re all still close and cool. I feel good about everything.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://ew.com/tv/2018/03/21/assassination-of-gianni-versace-ryan-murphy-finale/?utm_campaign=entertainmentweekly&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social









Very well-written article. heart

Decider wrote:
‘ACS Versace’ Never Caught On Like ‘O.J.’, Because It Was After Something Darker

Mar. 22, 2018

The People vs. O.J. Simpson was a phenomenon. The nation was going through a national re-experiencing of the Simpson scandal, with a competing documentary on ESPN and countless retrospectives. . .That treatment didn’t extend to The Assassination of Gianni Versace, and at least in this viewer’s opinion, it’s not because it was a major drop-off in quality.

Part of it we can chalk up to unavoidable factors. The murder of fashion designer Gianni Versace by serial killer Andrew Cunanan in the summer of 1997 was an infamous piece of tabloid news, but it didn’t come close to approaching the levels of notoriety that the O.J. Simpson trial got. . .  The People vs. O.J. Simpson was great because it tackled the racial, societal, media, and entertainment angles of the Simpson case and made us all re-examine it through new eyes. But it was popular, in large part, because it let the rapidly fracturing and fragmenting American audience re-experience something we had all watched together. That was not a card that the Versace series could play.

[ . . . ]

Viewers hoping for the operatic, quasi-campy version of The Assassination of Gianni Versace could probably have just watched the first and last episodes and have been satisfied. . .

But what made The Assassination of Gianni Versace such a special season of television was what came in between those first and last episodes. That was where Murphy and Smith stepped away from the glitz and glamour and celebrity and camp and peered into the darker recesses of Andrew Cunanan’s story. The story that they sketch out, sometimes via firsthand accounts, sometimes via speculation, ultimately tells a sinister but deeply grounded story about the corrosive effects of homophobia. How the closet shames and warps; how institutional homophobia silences gay victims and inadvertently abets their killers; how the twin prisons of masculinity and status can wreak havoc on so many lives. The story in these middle episodes pretty much set aside the likes of Penelope Cruz and Ricky Martin so they could tell a story about tortured soldiers, frightened sons, prideful widows, and, yes, the making of a murderer. The result was some of the most restrained work of Murphy’s prolific career. And maybe that was the problem.

[. . . ]

So, again, maybe Versace was never meant to catch fire in the culture the way that O.J. did. Maybe in an alternate universe, the Gianni-and-Donatella Fashion Hour told the story of the building of an empire that was cut down by a queer monster. By deciding to peel back the face of that queer monster and stare into the void inside, Murphy and Smith delivered a show that was much darker, though ironically no less illuminating, that the first American Crime Story season. Here’s hoping that with all the possibilities that suddenly lay before him, Ryan Murphy doesn’t take the relative quiet of season 2 as a reason to stay away from this kind of storytelling.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://decider.com/2018/03/22/american-crime-story-versace-didnt-reach-heights-of-oj-but-thats-good/










Interview with Ryan Murphy, where he also talks about Darren and Versace.  I also included the end part about Ryan's new shows.

Variety wrote:
Ryan Murphy on ‘Versace’ Finale, ‘9-1-1’ Plans and His Crazy Year Ahead

March 21, 2018

FX’s “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” was a long and grueling shoot that stretched from May to January . . .

But all of the time, energy and money devoted to “Versace” paid off for uber-executive producer Ryan Murphy, once he saw how star Darren Criss, writer/exec producer Tom Rob Smith, and director/exec producer Dan Minahan pulled off the final hour of the nine-episode series.

“It was that moment when you’re shooting the series that you’re waiting for. We knew the stuff Darren was going to have to do would be very, very emotional and upsetting, when he was finally caged and trapped,” Murphy told Variety. “It was hard for him. Darren had nobody to react to other than himself for most of the episode. He really arced the character so well and stripped it down to the bare essence at the end. It was very emotional and difficult material. Darren gave the performance of the year.”

Murphy said he’s gratified to see Criss receive generally strong reviews for the extremely demanding role that he hopes will open more more doors for the former “Glee” player.

“When you get stereotyped as a writer or an actor it’s hard to break out of that lane and show people you’re capable of so much more,” said Murphy. “I’m excited for him about what opens up for him.”

Murphy also hailed Minahan and Smith for taking the extra step of intense rehearsals for the climactic scenes of Cunanan alone as a squatter in a houseboat as the FBI’s manhunt closed in on him. . .

“Max Greenfield came back with this thesis statement about homophobia, Judith Light gave us this insane operatic monologue,” Murphy said. “We spent time with the victims, the people who lost things because of Cunanan’s murders.”

“Versace” did not land with the same pop culture punch as the inaugural “American Crime Story” series, 2016’s “The People V. O.J. Simpson.” To date the series has averaged about 3 million total viewers in Nielsen’s live-plus-7 ratings, compared to about 7.7 million for “People V. O.J. Simpson.”

Murphy said he knew that the “Versace” would draw a more modest crowd given the subject matter and the fact that the Simpson saga was so much more well known by the general public. But the larger message of “Versace’s” effort to demonstrate the homophobia and discrimination that hampered the police investigation of Cunanan’s killings has touched a nerve, based on the reactions Murphy has received.

“I can always tell if something is working or landing by how many people stop me on the street to tell me they’re binge-watching it and loving it,” he said. “I’m so proud about the message of the show. It meant a lot to people.”

[. . . ]


With “9-1-1,” Murphy has launched a hit for Fox in his waning months as a producer on the lot before he segues to a mammoth Netflix overall deal on July 1. Murphy hasn’t had time to hatch any brand-new ideas for his new network home — he’ll have his hands full during the next year delivering the four new shows — two for Netflix — that he already has in the pipeline in his soon-to-expire 20th Century Fox TV deal.

At present Murphy is in New York shooting the 1980s-set drama “Pose” for FX. In July he’s slated to begin work on the political satire “The Politician” and the eighth season of FX’s “American Horror Story.” When those shows wind down in January, he’ll reunite with Sarah Paulson on Netflix’s “Ratched,” the origin story of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’s” Nurse Ratched.

So while he won’t be actively developing new projects for at least a few months, Murphy won’t exactly be idle.

“There’s going to be a lot of extensive legwork and a lot of traveling for these shows. They all shoot in different cities,” Murphy said. “For the first time in a long time, I can tell you I feel pretty content. For now, I’m good.”
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/assassination-of-gianni-versace-darren-criss-ryan-murphy-finale-1202733335/







Discussion about the finale.

The Hollywood Reporter wrote:
'American Crime Story: Versace' Finale Is a Warning About How a Killer Is Made

March 21, 2018

Much of the hour-plus episode featured Cunanan becoming increasingly more emotional and hopeless as he took shelter on a houseboat, watching Gianni's (Edgar Ramirez) Italian funeral on television and reminiscing about his time with the designer. "What if you had a dream your whole life that you were special, but no one believed it," Cunanan asked. Versace responded that it wasn't about potential, it was about following through.

[ . . . ]

The finale, [Tom Rob] Smith explains, is "bringing together all of these people that were destroyed and damaged by Andrew, and really exploring what it is to lose someone. I think this is one of the few stories where the victim's loss is at the center of this piece — this hole that was created by Andrew."

[ . . . ]

The season also touched on the internalized homophobia within law enforcement at the time that potentially hindered the investigation of Cunanan's other murders before Versace — David Madson, Jeff Trail, Lee Miglin, William Reese — but Smith tells THR the way the homophobia affected Cunanan was also incredibly destructive.
Source:  https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/american-crime-story-versace-finale-explained-1095814










From acsversace-news:


Very insightful and well-written article. heart

TV Guide wrote:
The Assassination of Versace Showed How Everyone Pays a Steep Price for Homophobia

Mar. 22, 2018

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story creator Ryan Murphy said from the start that this iteration of the anthology series was about the impact of societal homophobia. That’s summed up, quite ironically, in one heartbreaking scene in the finale . . . It’s the moment that Gianni Versace’s (Edgar Ramirez) domestic partner Antonio D'Amico (Ricky Martin) tells Gianni’s sister Donatalla (Penelope Cruz) that he intends to stay at one of Gianni’s houses as he recovers from his partner’s murder. “The houses belong to the company,” she told him, barely concealing the disdain the real Donatella has acknowledged in press.

They’d been together for decades but that didn’t matter to his partner’s Catholic family. He didn’t even get acknowledged in the funeral service, but was sent packing in his time of mourning, which is just one of the f***d-up type of situations marriage equality activists fought to remedy with same-sex marriage. Until the Supreme Court legalized same sex marriage in 2015, countless LGBT/queer people knew this same kind of sting: being barred from the hospital rooms of sick partners; legally barred from going into the homes of deceased partners by family; forbidden visitation of children they helped raise after separation.

In its finale, Versace sewed up its grand message about homophobia — not just the injustice of it, but the costs. . . Anti-gay bias has been woven into the fabric of America’s institutions, and it showed: discrimination does more than just hurt feelings, and the harm it inflicts isn’t limited to just the gay community. Versace revealed the prejudice, ignorance and fear — particularly in government agencies that are supposed to help citizens — that created the circumstances that allowed Andrew to kill five people.

“It’s my most personal work,” Murphy told TV Guide in January. He affirmed that the story was indeed his form of activism. “I was very adamant about doing this because I came of age during this period. I understood the era: the violence of it, the threat of it. When I started, some of the executives were incredibly homophobic and said jaw-dropping things to me. I think people still marginalize gay creators and gay people. I still feel it.”

Questions, more so than answers, help conceive how fully the poisonous prejudice seeped into society. How much time and money and potential did Americans waste on recruiting, feeding, clothing, and training people like Jeff Trail (Finn Wittrock), who’d leave the Navy because of his sexual orientation? What did American institutions lose by shaming them into hiding or leaving the armed forces, . .  Might the FBI have caught Andrew sooner if agents had engaged the gay community as Detective Lori Wieder (Dascha Polanco) urged from the beginning rather than ignoring the deaths of, as Ronnie (Max Greenfield) put it, “a bunch of nobody gays?” How many lives are put in jeopardy, or worse, when someone like the drifter who bludgeoned Lincoln Aston gets off by invoking the gay panic defense? What greatness could Andrew’s talents have produced had he not been filled with shame and self-loathing all his life and told he was inherently sick for being gay? What’s really changed in the 20 years since?

A lot, but Versace hints that the pop culture achievements of our newly gay-friendly zeitgeist — the Drag Races and the Love, Simons and Ryan Murphy himself — are tenuous, thin advancements inside a system that’s still biased. After all, Gianni Versace was beloved by the media, the wealthy coastal elites who bought his clothes and the A-list celebrities who came to his shows, but his coming out still put the entire business at risk. His partner only got a portion of what he was due because he’d have had zero power in court. Versace is a paean to one of the greatest artists the world ever knew, but it also tallies the destruction of prejudice that has yet to be fully rooted out. That’s why Murphy, who will also debut Pose and Boys in the Band on Broadway this year, fought to tell this story and others like it, and it’s why he’s committed to hiring more directors who are female, people of color, queer, or intersections of the above. “All these projects are about asking one question,” he said. “Have we really come far enough? I think the answer is no.”
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source: http://www.tvguide.com/news/the-assassination-of-versace-homophobia/


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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"


From dcriss-archive:


Fox Force Five News wrote:
Darren Criss Delivers Performance of The Year in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story (Review)

March 22, 2018

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story explores the murder of designer Gianni Versace by serial killer Andrew Cunanan, based on Maureen Orth‘s book Vulgar Favors: Andrew Cunanan, Gianni Versace, and the Largest Failed Manhunt in U.S. History.

Much to my surprise – this story was INSANE. Literally one of the most impressive and profound true stories about a man’s descent into madness. Darren Criss’ performance as spree killer Andrew Cunanan is legendary. Think American Psycho meets Taxi Driver and we’re starting to get the whole picture here. Criss deserves every single acting award coming his way. There will not be a better acting performance in 2018 or maybe even years from now that can match the intensity and sadness that Criss has put on display here in these nine incredible episodes.

I know that the title of the series has Versace in it, but American Crime Story is all about Andrew Cunanan. We dive deep into the psyche of a killer and although we will never know WHY he did what he did, you will damn sure have a better understanding what led Cunanan down this path of death. Writer Tom Rob Smith doesn’t sympathise with Cunanan so much as peel back the layers of mystery of his life, so that viewers get the entire story, including that of his victims who all deserved to have their stories told in a profound way. Cody Fern for example — is a future star. Watch for that kid to do some amazing things down the road. Ryan Murphy stuck to his guns by casting Criss, known for Glee and his work in music and that decision turned out to be one of the best casting decisions of all time for the smallscreen. Hell – Ricky Martin could get an award too for playing Versace’s lover – those scenes in the finale – in the church? Unreal.

Following up the OJ Simpson mini-series was a huge undertaking, but I honestly think that ACS Versace was a sprawling and epic drama that did a better job getting into the mindset of everyone involved in this sweeping tragedy. Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz literally BECAME Gianni and Donatella Versace, not only in their physical appearances, but the accent and essence of these fashion icons. . .  having more time dedicated to understanding what may have drove Cunanan to murder was the right choice.

From the opening episode which shows the murder of Versace, to the final episode which wraps up all the loose ends in devastating fashion, ACS Versace might be the best mini-series yet from Ryan Murphy. And I’m including American Horror Story in that declaration. Darren Criss BECAME Andrew Cunanan for this role. You will not see a better character study of a serial killer than you will here. These nine episodes are constantly jumping back and forth in time (which I’m told may have turned off some viewers with its sporadic story structure) but I think that was the correct choice to take people on a better emotional journey. If we were to have told this story chronologically — I don’t think it would have captured our attention. The sporadic narrative was a necessary evil in order to uncover the essence of Cunanan’s insanity. There’s a monologue in the finale where Max Greenfield tells the police that Andrew isn’t hiding – he’s wanting to be seen and it really does sum up what happened with the botched investigation and pursuit of Cunanan in general. He was a gay man, killing other gay men — so law enforcement didn’t give a shit back then. Plain and simple – sad but true.

The glorification of serial killers isn’t what we were going for here and by the end of the series — Cunanan is most certainly not celebrated in any way whatsoever, but I do feel like Criss’ performance is culturally one of the most significant and impressive acting performances of our time. Whether he’s seducing older men with his IDGAF dance moves in a speedo, or when he’s wrapping tape around his face while having a shower – Criss is doing something unlike any other character in years. He’s bizarre, scary and at times – enigmatic. The episode in which he shows up to a party, rips off his trenchcoat to reveal that red leather suit and struts right into that house like a boss – is one of the best scenes of 2018. Andrew just wanted to be remembered and although the murderer will likely fade into obscurity, I hope that Criss’ iconic performance stands the test of time. It’s that good. 

Rating: ★★★★★
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.foxforcefivenews.com/darren-criss-delivers-performance-of-the-year-in-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-review/

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From acsversace-news:



Reel Talk wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story Season Finale

March 22, 2018

Throughout the series, we have seen some compelling performances. Finn Wittrock gave humanity to naval officer Jeffrey Trail that would likely make those who knew him proud, while Cody Fern gave you poignant insight into Cunanan’s most personal victim, David Madson. The namesake of this series can’t be ignored either. Edgar Ramirez has turned in fine work as Gianni Versace, portraying him as driven but ultimately a sensitive soul who was proud of his accomplishments. Whether it was pushing his sister Donatella, or tender moments with Antonio, Ramirez hit all the right notes in the role and gave the character much more depth than was probably on the page.

That being said, the real MVP here is Darren Criss. From start to finish he has delivered on all fronts as Andrew Cunanan. This isn’t an easy role to portray. Cunanan was a known liar and manipulator but for awhile he was able to get people to buy what he was selling. He was charming but, as we know now, largely unhinged. Criss balances all of these aspects of his personality with the greatest of ease and he makes it so seamless that it’s pretty scary to watch. To be likable on one level and out of your mind insane is no easy feat, but Criss makes it look effortless. Glee made Criss a household name but this is the kind of role that makes you a star. If he doesn’t sweep all the awards for his portrayal here, it would be a travesty of epic proportions.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source.   https://www.reeltalkinc.com/assassination-of-gianni-versace-finale/







Decider wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ Season Finale Recap: This Means Nothing To Me

Mar. 22, 2018

Across the board, the performances — from Darren Criss, Édgar Ramírez, Penélope Cruz, Ricky Martin, Judith Light, Jon Jon Briones, Joanna P. Adler, Annaleigh Ashford, Dascha Polanco, and Max Greenfield, with Criss and Light especially putting in absolutely crushing work — resist grandiose or valedictory choices
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source.  https://decider.com/2018/03/22/acs-versace-season-finale-recap/












Slash Film wrote:
‘American Crime Story’ Review: ‘Alone’ Brings the Story to an End

March 22, 2018

Darren Criss’ portrayal of Andrew Cunanan is exemplary. The actor brought the character to life, and while some of the writing could’ve easily turned Andrew into something close to parody, Criss’ performance walked a tightrope and balanced it all.
   http://www.slashfilm.com/american-crime-story-alone-review/











From dcriss-archive:











































































Michael Stern: TBT—-Since last nights finale of “Versace” I sure hope Darren Criss receives lots accolades for his work for the role of a serial killer. Here’s some other pics through the years.










mypaperheart352: I’ve been raving to everyone about how good @americancrimestoryfx is this season, ESPECIALLY @darrencriss’s extraordinary performance as #AndrewCunanan. Tonight is the season finale, so once it’s done, I suggest y’all binge watch this season. You won’t regret it! Thank you so much Darren for taking your time and always being superrrr nice to the fans. You deserve allll the awards heart :heart eyes #darrencriss #americancrimestory #acsversace #versace














































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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"



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Hydrogen wrote:
‘THE ASSASSINATION OF GIANNI VERSACE’ FINALE: DARREN CRISS STEALS THE SHOW AS WE LOOK BACK AT A TRAGEDY

March 23, 2018

That all-consuming need to be seen, to be relevant, to matter, but falling devastatingly short, defines Andrew Cunanan’s character, portrayed by Darren Criss in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story on FX. . .

[ . . .]

But Darren Criss’s Cunanan is the star of the show, which could have easily been titled, “The descent of Andrew Cunanan: The Gianni Versace Murder.”

[. . . ]

Darren Criss in particular, can look forward to awards season recognition for his haunting and engrossing portrayal of a sociopath. For a character so easy to despise and discard, Criss strove to make us understand. His empathetic, yet deranged take on this pathetic figure was simply unforgettable and worthy of high praise.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://hydrogen-mag.com/archives/36213









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From Darren Criss Army:




The cast and crew share their favorite scenes from The Assassination of Gianni Versace.

(Source: youtube.com)









I approve of this friendship.  :happy face

#acsversace heart

Via Edgar’s IG March 23, 2018 https://instagram.com/p/BgrzesYFPq0/



















Aw, such a sweet message. 

“What an amazing finale! I’m so proud to have been a part of this amazing show! It was a dream of mine to be a part of Ryan Murphy’s universe, and I learned so much from it.  colors #acs #fx” - EdouardHoldener
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bgr2ZlLnwpF/











BBCTwo: If you haven’t seen #ACSVersace yet, @darrencriss’s performance as serial killer Andrew Cunanan is on another level…

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I forgot to add this before (haven't had a chance to listen to it):


 
 

Track: "Alone" with Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson
Artist: Still Watching: Versace

acsversace-news:

“Alone” with Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson
Joanna Robinson and Richard Lawson discuss “Alone,” the final episode of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story and how the show chose to portray the final days of Andrew Cunanan. More from star Darren Criss and Executive Producers Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson are the featured interview.
via dcriss-archive








EDIT:  I added a few items:


From dcriss-archive:


The Wrap wrote:
Party Report: Inside Darren Criss, Ricky Martin’s ‘Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Finale Celebration (Photos)

March 24, 2018



FX threw a “finale” celebration for the “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” at the DGA on Sunset Blvd. on Monday night to bookend a season that launched with a Mer-man and models strolling a glittering runway in Hollywood. Why don’t more hit TV shows celebrate the end like this? A few hundred guests (and Emmy voters) got a sneak preview of the last episode and some face time with the stars, writers and directors (including director Matt Bomer, far right) but unfortunately no Ryan Murphy.



“I’m not playing a killer. I’m playing a person,” lead actor Darren Criss, who plays serial killer Andrew Cunanan, said. “Once you enter it from that portal, it’s a little easier to understand.” We have a hunch we’ll be seeing a lot Criss over this Emmy season. It’s indisputably his show, even if he claimed a subordinate position in the group photo at the top of this gallery.

Source:  https://www.thewrap.com/party-report-inside-darren-criss-ricky-martins-assassination-gianni-versace-finale-celebration-photos/











From acsversace-news:


haha.  I like Edgar.  :happy face

edgarramirez25: Trying my new [eye-glasses emoji]...and suddenly looking spookily similar to… confused . Probándome mis nuevos lentes y de pronto me parezco a… :big grin  #acsversace  #instaAndrew



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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"


From acsversace-news:



Show Snob wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace finale recap: Alone

March 24, 2018

This season was so extremely addicting to watch, and every moment was so pivotal to the character development of Andrew Cunanan. It was an intricately woven storyline that illustrated the life of a man who no one truly ever knew. The nod to the 90’s and homosexuality was a big theme in the season and highlighted the discrimination of the time. Darren Criss was hands down the standout performer of the season and his portrayal of Cunanan will be one for the books–hopefully Emmy books, right?

For many episodes of the season, he single-handedly took on most of the work and carried the show on his back. And while the season had its share of ups and downs, we will surely miss seeing Criss’ angsty manipulative portrayal of Cunanan.


Source:  https://showsnob.com/2018/03/23/assassination-of-gianni-versace-finale-recap/








This episode discusses Episodes 8 and 9.  It makes some very insightful comments about Episode 8, about Modesto's experiences as an immigrant from the Philippines to America.   I also like what the article said about the finale of the series (Episode 9).

The Film Experience wrote:
"ACS: The Assassination of Gianni Versace", Finale

March 23, 2018

Episode 8:  "Creator/Destroyer"

This final confrontation between Andrew and his father puts together all the themes of the show in a superbly acted showcase for both performers [Darren and Jon Jon Briones]. It’s about immigrant sacrifice, it’s about the faults and privileges of the American Dream, it’s about abandoning your identity in pursuit of a better one, it’s about not being able to escape who you are and where you come from. It all escalates to a physical confrontation, in which Modesto dares Andrew to kill him, taunting him that he is not “man enough” to do it. Knowing that their relationship is now broken forever, Andrew returns to the U.S. He distances himself from his father, not realizing that he will still carry on everything he taught him for the rest of his life. He could not kill him.

[ . . . ]

Episode 9:  "Alone"

While this series was very much Andrew’s story, his actions had long-lasting consequences way past the murders and his own suicide.

The show is now over. I may need some time to fully sit with it as it was not an easy watch. It was a raw and often uncomfortable look at difficult issues that are still widely relevant inside the gay community, shown through the lens of a serial killer.

But I do think we will look back at it as a powerful piece of queer art. Its performances are incredible, especially Darren Criss’s, doing the best work of his career. The series was not at all the kitschy, soapy crime drama that was advertised. It was a necessary and beautifully crafted deep dive into a subculture of society that is never represented with such honesty, willing to portray the ugly side as brightly as what makes it soar. It wasn’t O.J., and perhaps it was a mistake to expect that. Versace is its own thing: ethereal, painful, a strange and unsettling product of beauty.
Source:  http://thefilmexperience.net/blog/2018/3/23/acs-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-finale.html







I also found some interesting commentary in this article.

Oxygen wrote:
Versace Killer Andrew Cunanan's Suicide Depicted In 'American Crime Story' Season Finale

March 23, 2018

Murphy also seals his series with some last statements on gay identity, tying up the through line of his anthology. D'Amico is left with nothing, as his marriage to Gianni was never legal. Pete’s denial of Andrew’s homosexuality only proves that Andrew’s life of lies was — in a way — necessary for his own survival. Miglin’s lost charities —which he needed to keep hidden from his wife — are left without their benefactor. Madson’s father wonders what troubles brewed beneath his murdered son’s perfect veneer.

Again, it would have been easy to portray Cunanan as some kind of grotesque joke, but Murphy's depiction of both Andrew and his victims as sympathetic people in dire situations due to the cruelty of homophobia elevates what might have been a schlocky, neon-drenched massacre to higher levels. While we were promised a vampy story of the Versace family's downfall, Murphy's bait-and-switch allowed the auteur to explore uncharted territories of the gay zeitgeist.
Source:  http://www.oxygen.com/crime-time/versace-killer-andrew-cunanans-suicide-depicted-in-american-crime-story-season-finale












via acsversace-news












From dcriss-archive:















Sweet message from this fan and cute pic.  :happy face

michelle_oliver: About that time I almost made it into #ACSVersace … @DarrenCriss is as sweet as he is talented. Thanks @ACSFX @TheOrganicActor









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Last edited by Poppy on Sun Mar 25, 2018 11:57 pm; edited 1 time in total


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So, that's it, it's over.

Well, it isn't really the kind of tv show I like and Andrew isn't a very likeable character but it was nice to see Darren acting every week on my screen, being for once the star of a story and playing a new kind of character, very different of who he is in real life. 

I hope he'll get soon a big new role in a TV series (a show I watch or would watch anyway), this time playing a more likeable character and, let's dream a little, having at the same time the opportunity to show his singing skills.

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Jeremy wrote:
Well, it isn't really the kind of tv show I like and Andrew isn't a very likeable character but it was nice to see Darren acting every week on my screen, being for once the star of a story and playing a new kind of character, very different of who he is in real life. 


Versace isn't the type of show I normally would watch either, due to the realistic violence that made me feel awful, although I do admire that the show shined a light on the theme of the oppression of the LGBTQ community due to institutional homophobia.  I also really appreciate that the show touches upon the experience of an immigrant of Filipino ancestry seeking to achieve the American Dream in Episode 8.  I read in one review of  Episode 8, that the portrayal of Modesto Cunanan explodes the stereotype of Asian folks being the "model minority."  And of course, the acting and the writing (and the direction and cinematography) are fantastic. 

Yes, even though Andrew is not the type of character that I could bond emotionally with, it was nice to see Darren on my TV set.  And it was especially a joy for me to see Darren stretch his acting muscles, in a very demanding, complex, challenging role.  I really enjoyed that part, even if his character made so uncomfortable and even if I hated his character for most of the show.  I give a huge amount of credit to Darren for his acting.  In fact, I surprised myself that I actually felt sympathy and empathy for Andrew Cunanan in the finale.  I honestly didn't expect that, because I hated Andrew Cunanan progressively more as I watched the character in the show killed more characters, as he caused emotional and physical pain to, and ended the lives of, more and more good men who I had bonded with.  

I so agree with you--I love it when I see actors who I like take on diverse roles, not just similar roles.

Jeremy wrote:I hope he'll get soon a big new role in a TV series (a show I watch or would watch anyway), this time playing a more likeable character and, let's dream a little, having at the same time the opportunity to show his singing skills.

Oh--I would so love it if that happened.  Yes to everything you said (although I also would be very happy if he was simply on a good TV show, even if he did not sing). 




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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"




I had read one of the reviews of Versace by Matt Brennan, TV Editor with Paste Magazine, and I thought it was extremely touching and eloquent.   Here is the link for Matt's first review about Versace:  https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2018/01/american-crime-story-assassination-of-gianni-versa.html



I haven't had a chance to read his second article about Versace, but when I have a chance, I intend to give it a read.   Here is the link for Matt's second article about Versace:  https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2018/03/why-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-is-the-yea.html





Matt Brennan is a guest in this podcast ("Forgettable Conversations with Dan Massar).  I find this podcast interesting in that Matt talks about some of the themes of the show, as well as sharing his opinions about several of the actors.  (I don't see any way to identify points of time in this podcast, but if you want to hear the part where Matt and Dan discuss their views about Darren's performance, skip over to where the "a" is in "Dan,"  in the tittle "Forgettable Conversations with Dan Massar."  Sorry, I don't know how else to identify a point in time in that podcast.)  Matt is very, very complimentary of Darren's performance--high praise!



Let’s talk TV! ACS: Versace

A chat with Paste Magazine TV Editor Matt Brennan about The FX series The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story. Dan and Matt talk about this riveting series and some of the standout performances. Plus stay until the end for a couple shows Matt suggests we should all be watching. | 23 March 2018
via acsversace-news











And this is Matt Brennan and Tom Rob Smith communicating via Twitter:


Source / Link to article

Link to article:  https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2018/03/why-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-is-the-yea.html
















From dcriss-archive:  (See below about Rian Johnson)











Note: dcriss-archive also posted this:  :happy face



**Rian Johnson is an American film director, screenwriter, editor, and actor. Johnson directed and wrote Brick (2005), The Brothers Bloom (2008), Looper (2012) and Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017)
















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Poppy, did you post your impression about the finale in particular ? I don't find it.

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Hi Jeremy.  I'm sorry, but I haven't had a chance to do that.  I will try to get to that, hopefully this week, but it all depends on other factors, if I can find the time.  (It takes some time for me to write and type out my thoughts, and I probably would try to watch the episode again, since a few days have passed.)  Sorry for being vague.


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434default Quotes about Darren and Tweets about Darren on Tue Mar 27, 2018 1:01 am

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Quotes about Darren and Tweets about Darren



From acsversace-news.  So cool that Rian Johnson is following Darren.  And he said very nice things about the show and Jon Jon Briones.  :happy face






Rian Johnson’s, Tom Rob Smith’s, and Zedrick Restauro’s tweets | 25 March 2018











From dcriss-archive:


Anthony Sabella is a reporter for WTKR3.



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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"


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acsversace-news:
      USA Today Life Critic’s Corner | 26 March 2018

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TV Insider wrote:
Ask Matt: Trouble in Shondaland? 'Madam Secretary,' 'Versace,' 'SEAL Team' Going to the Dogs, 'Good Doctor' and More

March 27, 2018


Was Versace an Afterthought in Crime Story?

Question
: Now that Season 2 of FX’s American Crime Story has concluded, it is more than apparent that Ryan Murphy didn’t have enough material about Versace to cover the entire season, let alone one episode. If he was to delete the scenes about Andrew Cunanan and just focus on Versace’s life and tragic death. the show would be much less watchable to me. Most of the parts dealing with Gianni Versace, his sister and lover were auite dull. Conversely the parts (thankfully the vast majority of the series) dealing with Andrew Cunanan were spectacular and highly addictive. Overall, I grade the series an A- or 4 and a half out of 5. — Fred

Matt Roush
: My magazine review (covering the first eight of nine episodes) gave the series four out of five stars, so we’re pretty much on the same page. (I’d give the remarkable Darren Criss as Cunanan five stars or more.) We’ve covered some of this ground before, but now that the entire series has aired, I feel I need to point out that the title aside (The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story), the psychopathy of Andrew Cunanan was always the primary focus of this project, but it would never have been made—and Cunanan would have been a footnote in the annals of true crime—if he hadn’t selected this famous, unwitting target. Producing a biography of Gianni Versace was never this series’ intent, and while those scenes certainly lacked the drama and intensity of Cunanan’s delusional reign of terror, I appreciated the contrast between the openly gay man who earned his fame and was loved, and the twisted, tormented poseur who used his sexuality for the most debased purposes. I also was quite moved in the final episode by the tragedy of Ricky Martin’s character, the widowed Antonio, who even in a supposedly progressive industry like fashion was sidelined by the family (and, less surprisingly, shunned by a priest at the funeral).
Source:  https://www.tvinsider.com/676818/ask-matt-madam-secretary-versace-seal-team-good-doctor/






4 Your Excitement wrote:
4YE’s TV Reels Feels For March 18th Through March 24th

March 26, 2018


Top Performer

Clare:
What a surprise, Darren Criss in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story wins hands down for me this week and I’m sure this isn’t the only highly prestigious accolade he will be taking home for his performance as Andrew Cunanan over the next year. While he was absolutely spectacular throughout the 9-week series, in this finale “Alone” he was outstanding. Spending the majority of the episode holed up alone in the houseboat, the episode really hinged on his ability to carry the story and he did it and more. This performance is going to stick with you for a while to come. While it doesn’t excuse at all the horrendously evil acts committed by Cunanan, Criss’ performance inspired sympathy but also frustration at such wasted potential and the enormous potential in others that he ruthlessly cut short. Prepare your acceptance speeches, Mr Criss. You’ll be needing them over the next few months.

Top Episode


Clare:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story has me enthralled from the get-go, but “Alone” left me with goosebumps and needing to collect myself after the credits rolled. What a powerful 90 minutes or so of television and a fantastic and fitting conclusion to the series. While Darren Criss was definitely the standout performer, everyone brought their A-game week after week and the finale was no different. From Ricky Martin’s Antonio’s pain to Jon Jon Briones’ Modesto’s playing of his son, to the stoicness of Penelope Cruz’s Donatella, the tragedy of the events and how they affected everyone was so clear.

Top Moment


Clare:
As the Feds are closing in on Andrew Cunanan in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, we get a scene of a resigned and scared adult Cunanan watching the reports of the Feds’ efforts to get him out of the houseboat joined by the younger version of himself (played by Edouard Holdener). The look shared by the child and adult Cunanan was so beautiful in its simplicity and tragedy. Here Andrew finally has the fame and recognition that he has been told has been his due all his life and that he has seeked, but it’s for all the wrong reasons and has lead to his death. This was so heartbreaking.

Top Quote


Clare:

“Andrew is not hiding, he’s trying to be seen” – The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
via acsversace-news

Source:  http://www.4ye.co.uk/2018/03/4yes-tv-reels-feels-for-march-18th-through-march-24th/
















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From Darren Criss Army:





The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | Inside Season 2

Twenty years later, the story still resonates. The cast and crew discuss what they learned from the incredible and tragic events.

(Source: youtube.com)







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From Darren Criss Army:


americancrimestoryfx: “He knew he was wanted, but wouldn’t be taken alive. #ACSVersace








From dcriss-archive:



Cody Fern talks about working with Darren on ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace’ | Source

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Matthew D'Ambrosio is a writer (The Vampire Diaries).  De' Jon Pier'e is a fashion brand.













From acsversace-news:

Here is the whole video of Gold Derby's interview with Cody Fern:



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Wow, this is impressive that this was done.  Well done!


mintysmoothie:
acsversace-news:

LINK

Please direct questions or comments to my personal blog

So this is finally (FINALLY) done! I’ve been working on this project since episode 2 and inserting episodes as they come out, but around episode 7 I accidentally deleted my video files and had to start over again, which is why it’s out a little later than I wanted. It all worked out in the end though.

Notes:

- Some liberties were taken in balancing the real life timeline and ACS’ own timeline which the show can’t even stick to sometimes.

- Unfortunately I can’t make any edits or correct any errors in parts 1 and 2. The project was eating up massive storage space and I had to delete them.

- It turns out that the edit doesn’t easily go from episodes 8 to 1, then 9. The timeline order: 8, 1, 5, 7, 2, 7, 5, 7, 6, 5, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 9, 1, 9, 2, 9. It’s a fucking roller coaster.

- Thanks to @musexmoirai for giving me advice on a section/arc that imo turned out beautifully and changed my perspective on an episode I previously felt lukewarm about. A side effect of re-arranging scenes is that some of the connecting themes get pulled apart, but at the same time there are opportunities to build something new(ish) with pieces that you didn’t know could connect. I think this kind of exercise justifies the existence of a recut.

- If the videos get taken down, just PM me and I’ll send private download links.
mintysmoothie:  https://mintysmoothie.tumblr.com/post/172348376755/acsversace-news-link-please-direct-questions-or




Wow thank you SO much for doing this!!!





One of us (the crazy one) was actually working on this too, but hadn’t gotten nearly as far. It’s great that you have already made it happen! 

We know many folks are just going to watch 8-1 and then 9 as we talked about way back at the beginning, but we already were thinking it makes more sense to do full chronological order. We’ll help spread the word. And again, thanks!!!
via Darren Criss Army










From dcriss-archive:















NetflixES: Cuando llevas tres meses esperando y por fin todos los episodios de #ACSVersace están disponibles.
*When you’ve spent three months waiting and finally all episodes of #ACSVersace are available

via dcriss-archive









:amused








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Photo Credit: narmdaddy

*Jeremy*

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Advanced II
Advanced II
I took a quick look at the articles in Dutch and French. Mainstream Dutch-speaking media barely talk about it, maybe because the show is not on air on a Dutch-speaking channel. But the airing of the season in France has been covered by the major French media. These articles are positive (a comment that I've often seen is that the show isn't about Versace but about his killer) and Darren gets praise for his performance. A big magazine even released an article about his career.

Poppy

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Administrator
Administrator
Hi Jeremy.  :hello   That's so cool that Darren is getting coverage from major French media and that the comments about his performance are positive.  applause



EDIT:  Added this:


From dcriss-archive:


This was so sad--how hard it must have been for his mother to see all of this.   Given how dependent she was on Andrew too, it must have been extremely difficult for her to be alone without him.   She must had felt so much of a loss when he was gone, and then she must have felt such a deep loss when she found out he killed himself.



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