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The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story



From acsversace-news:




Warning:  Spoilers!
Decider wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ Episode 4 Recap: Drive

Feb. 8, 2018

But I’m saving my final praise for Darren Criss as Andrew one more time. Not just for the delicate balance he must strike around David between unpredictable violence and careful reassurance throughout the episode, nor even for his final act of tenderness toward his victim (who’d hallucinated a reunion with his father before dying) — curling up with the corpse for a last embrace before driving away. No, the highlight here is the endless closeup on Criss/Cunanan’s face as he listens to a roadhouse performance of the Cars’ “Drive” by guest star Aimee Mann while his beloved victim sneaks off to the men’s room, debating whether or not to try and flee. He breaks before your eyes, there’s no other way to put it, and he does so over the same sentiment David will eventually express to him, getting himself killed in the process: “You can’t go on thinking nothing’s wrong.”



Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source: 
https://decider.com/2018/02/08/the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-episode-4-recap-drive/








Warning:  Spoilers!
Birth. Movies. Death wrote:
THE ASSASSINATION OF GIANNI VERSACE Review: “House By The Lake”

Feb. 09, 2018

Criss continues to earn every ounce of praise that’s been heaped upon his performance as Cunanan this season - alternating from chilly, black-eyed stares, to callously dancing in the car to “Pump Up the Jam”, to cuddling with Madson’s body on the shore after he shoots him in the back.

As Andrew takes David’s hand in the middle of that dive, and the two listen to a shitty cover of The Cars’ “Drive”, we see Madson momentarily understand this lonely, desperate psychopath. Through all the abuse, punishment and (ultimately) death Cunanan doles out to this equal, the same struggle with loneliness and rejection can be found in his eyes.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2018/02/09/the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-review-house-by-the-lake









Warning:  Spoilers!
TV Guide wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace Actor Explains Why David Madson Didn't Run

Feb. 7, 2018

As Ryan Muphy did with The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, Versace makes decades-old events, the outcomes of which are already public knowledge, feel like they’re happening in the exact moment. Darren Criss’ intoxicating performance makes Jeff’s murder and David’s unforced captivity urgent and believable too — so much so that it’s almost impossible to watch the scenes play out and not hope, scream or pray that David runs.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.tvguide.com/news/assassination-of-gianni-versace-david-madson/








Towleroad wrote:
‘American Crime Story’ Goes On A Gruesome Road Trip Without Gianni [RECAP]

February 8, 2018

It was a tense hour-plus of television, anchored once again by a chilling performance from Darren Criss. (Give this boy an Emmy nom, folks, he’s quite literally killing it.)
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.towleroad.com/2018/02/versace-recap-3/









The Tracking Board wrote:
AMERICAN CRIME STORY Review: “House By the Lake”

February 8, 2018

Next week I assume we will flash back earlier than Minneapolis, though I also understand if the writers take us back to the present to show us what is going on with the Versaces post-death. But I am really digging this criminal profile of Cunanan and how they are unfolding it. I almost would be okay with the rest of the episodes were just surrounding him (Darren Criss is killing it, in more way than one). But I finally get what they are doing and am completely on board after being hesitant the first few weeks.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.tracking-board.com/american-crime-story-review-house-by-the-lake/









Warning:  Spoilers about Episode 4!
Slash Film wrote:
‘American Crime Story’ Review: ‘House By the Lake’ Tells a Tragic Tale

February 8, 2018

As always, Darren Criss’ performance as Andrew remains a highlight, but Andrew has grown more and more despicable and detestable as the season has continued, which ultimately makes spending time with him distasteful. It’s a very tough balancing act, and Criss pulls it off for the most part. But there’s only so much we can take. A shot near the end of Andrew cuddling David’s dead body is particularly blood curdling.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.slashfilm.com/american-crime-story-house-by-the-lake-review/









I like the last paragraph of this article, that the show pays tribute to the good men who were Cunanan's victims, and that society was complicit in the tragedies of their deaths.   And completely agree this is why we need shows like this, to reveal issues that need to be discussed.   Since I haven't seen many episodes yet, I reserve judgment on the issue of whether Andrew is shown by the series to hold or not hold the potential to be a good person.
Yahoo News! UK wrote:
'The Assassination of Gianni Versace' Episode 4 recap: Toxic friendship

7 February 2018

For the past two weeks we’ve seen Andrew Cunanan embody every gay fear and insecurity (both society’s and gay peoples’ own) and use his warped mind to destroy upstanding, good men. Good men, the kind he could never be and never would be. A smarter person than me could write an articulate essay about how Cunanan was a product of his time, or a symbol, or whatever. But the more important take-away from these two episodes, I think, was the greatness and dignity of Lee Miglin and David Madson. Though Cunanan ultimately wielded the tools by which they died, The Assassination of Gianni Versace wants to remind us that the world they existed in was at the very least complicit. It’s a dark thought, but a necessary one. And that’s how a show as complicated and frankly stomach-churning as this one is as essential as television gets.
Source:  https://uk.news.yahoo.com/assassination-gianni-versace-episode-4-recap-toxic-friendship-042432559.html









Spoilers about Episode 3!  This review does not focus on Episode 4.
GQ India wrote:
American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace is the TV show to follow right now

Feb. 8, 2018

And with the search for Andrew Cunanan, the not-so-charming psychopathic prostitute, comes an inquisition of a homophobic society: The America of the Eighties and Nineties, also the time that the AIDS crisis was at its peak.

[. . . ]

Edward Ramirez’s Gianni is a gentleman, dignified and generous, driven by the pursuit of beauty; Penelope Cruz’s Donatella molded in granite compared to him, enchanting, persistent, business-minded; Ricky Martin slightly over-doing the heartbroken ‘partner’, but it works. And Darren Criss, magnificent as the beautiful and grotesque Cunanan, oozing charm and becoming whatever people wanted him to be, saying whatever they wanted to hear.

Over nine episodes, the show will show us all five murders, and countless other petty crimes of Cunanan’s. And it’s pretty hard stuff: such as the scene just after Cunanan’s finished with Lee Miglin in the third episode, “A Random Killing”, . . . . It’s nausea-inducing stuff, but there’s other, more to make you queasy: Like that scene described at the beginning of this piece; Or when suits at the FBI office discussing the murders confuse Versace with Liberace; or when the cop interrogating Antonio D’Amico refuses to ‘comprehend’ what he means by being Gianni’s ‘partner’. Makes you think the ‘assassination’ in the title isn’t just for dramatic effect, after all.

Of course, there’s a lot of attention to detail in re-creating that Nineties atmosphere – the discotheques and La Bouche thumping through sunny, progressive Miami’s streets and Speedo-dotted-beaches and denim cut-off shorts. But who has time for nostalgia when there’s a murderer on the prowl; and a tabloid-hooked society bent on keeping the closet locked?
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:   https://www.gqindia.com/content/american-crime-story-assassination-gianni-versace-tv-show-follow-right-now/








Review about Episode 2.   Warning:  Spoilers!  
Rogues Portal wrote:
TV Review: The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story S02E02 “Manhunt”

February 8, 2018

Andrew Cunanan’s American Psycho-lite presentation is both aesthetically interesting and completely horrifying. The show seems to even quote Michael Mann’s Manhunter when Andrew emerges from the bathroom, face taped up like the man he picked up earlier. It’s important to display those awful elements and keep into perspective that, even though Andrew seems to be the centre of the series, he was a monster. The moments when he isn’t performing are morbidly intriguing. Darren Criss shines in every scene, but there’s something deeper when we see Andrew being Andrew. When he’s doggedly trying to track down Versace. Or, when he says this to a man at the club who just wanted to know what he does:
I’m a serial killer… I said, ‘I’m a banker’. I’m a stockbroker. I’m a shareholder. I’m a paperback writer. I’m a cop. I’m a naval officer. Sometimes I’m a spy. I build movie sets in Mexico and skyscrapers in Chicago. I sell propane in Minneapolis. I import pineapples from the Philippines. You know, I’m the person least likely to be forgotten. I’m Andrew Cunanan.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.roguesportal.com/tv-review-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-s02e02-manhunt/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter








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Aw, this is nice of Andy Cohen.  :happy face

bravoandy: Sitting next to @darrencriss at @toddsnyderny. Darren not only looks like my son, he’s brilliant in #ACSVersace on FX! Also the Todd Snyder show was great (Photo by Ben Gabbe/ Getty Images)




















Deena Lang works on 104.3 The Shark.  Collin McCollough is Senior Deputy Editor of Bleacher Report.  Patricia Traina covers the NY giants for Inside Football.com.  Damon Gonzalez is involved in production and is an actor and writer (Locale Magazine).   Ava Allan is an actor.   Evette Dionne is senior Culture Editor for Bitch Media.





















 












 











jessica_o_: In awe of #DarrenCriss every week on #ACSVersace - #photo by @katwirsing for #Esquire.com | #MensGrooming by me using #RandCoHair

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*Jeremy*

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Episode 4 was pretty dark too... David didn't seem sympathetic in the season trailer but this episode changes everything. Actually, the two last episodes make you get attached to characters and then make you watch them suffer or be murdered lol. But, in this show, as we go backwards, the death of a character doesn't mean we won't see him or her again.

The series could get less dramatic until now, as we have already seen all the murders.

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I agree, Jeremy, David was incredibly sympathetic in the episode.  It saddened me so much.

Ooops!   So sorry, forgot to put this in a spoiler box.  :apology

Spoiler:


I kept yelling at the TV for him to jump out of the window and run. 

It still haunts me.  I keep thinking about Cody Fern's portrayal of David Madson.  Cody's portrayal of David was so heartbreaking because of David Madson's own struggles with accepting that he was gay, during this stifling time when homophobia was the norm among straight society.  Andrew just used that vulnerability, like a combatant picking on a previous injury of his opponent in a physical fight to dominate that opponent.

I know this is a very rough analogy, but in my mind, Cody Fern's portrayal of David Madson brought to my mind, a dog who has been emotionally abused to such a large extent by not just one owner, but a series of people, that even when given the opportunity to run, if the rope that tethered that dog to a fence was cut, the dog was so unsure of its chances of survival,  that the dog would chose to remain with its current abuser.  

That scene in the car, where David Madson said something to the effect that he keeps playing over and over in his mind, that his whole life he has been running away from the possibility of being disgraced by being discovered.  It just breaks your heart.


Jeremy wrote:But, in this show, as we go backwards, the death of a character doesn't mean we won't see him or her again.

The series could get less dramatic until now, as we have already seen all the murders.

Yes, that is true.  The structure of the series is such that the last images you will view of David Madson and Jeff Trail hopefully will be of them alive and living their lives. 

I confess that I've been so tense watching the last 2 episodes because of the violence, that I wonder if I it prevents me from really appreciating the story-telling, really appreciating the characters, really investing emotionally in the characters, because I'm apprehensive of the great violence that will befall them.

EDIT:

I think I still greatly appreciate the writing and the acting in the last 2 episodes, which has clearly impressed me (how can it not impress me?).  I just feel a little distant and cautious.

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Sorry, Jeremy, I forgot to reply to your last comment.

Jeremy wrote:
The series could get less dramatic until now, as we have already seen all the murders.

Whew.  I can say that I'm good with that.  If the following episodes focus on characterization and the stories of the lives of the characters pre-murder/death, I will like that.  :happy face  (I mean, the fact that we know they will be murdered by Cunanan will cast a dark, dark cloud that remains at the back of our minds, but still, I hope we get an opportunity to see the characters in how they were living their lives during this time period, before their deaths.  Each of these victims of Cunanan left a legacy of good, and I like to think that this will be given its due--given the attention that it deserves.)


From Darren Criss Army:


The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | Inside Season 2: Miami | FX

Everything was happening in 1990’s Miami.  Get an inside look at the setting of The Assassination of Gianni Versace with the cast and crew.

(Source: youtube.com)








From dcriss-archive:



americancrimestoryfx: Manipulation is Andrew’s most powerful tool. #ACSVersace

via dcriss-archive








 Track: Elvis Duran And The Morning Show (02-09-18)
Elvis Duran and Danielle Monaro talking about Darren and “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (February 9th, 2018)

via dcriss-archive








Spoiler pics for Episode 5:







acsversace-news:
Stills of Darren Criss and Finn Wittrock in Episode 5 of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | 9 February 2018










This is funny.  Refers to the Youtube video that Jeremy posted above.  :big grin












From acsversace-news:


This is wonderful news!  Episode 2's (which aired January 24, 2018)  Live + 7 ratings :
acsversace-news wrote:
Episode 2 of the Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story drew in a total of 3.41 million viewers and a 1.1 in the 18-49 demo in L+7 ratings.

TV by the Numbers wrote:
‘Waco’ premiere doubles in cable Live +7 ratings for Jan. 22-28

February 8, 2018










Source:  http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/dvr-ratings/cable-live-7-ratings-for-jan-22-28-2018/

via acsversace-news






This is nice (Episode 4, which aired February 7, 2018): 


via acsversace-news







Spoilers for Episode 4! This is interesting.  Producer Brad Simpson gives some background about Darren filming that scene in the club where Aimee Mann sings "Drive," which is when Andrew Cunanan breaks down in tears, and David Madson struggles to make a decision of whether to try to escape or not.
Vanity Fair wrote:
American Crime Story:  The Truth Behind That Surprising Musical Cameo

February 7, 2018

Yeah—the lyrics “you can’t go on thinking nothing’s wrong” seem pretty appropriate here. I wanted to ask for your take on what Darren Criss is giving in that scene as he listens to the song. We see Andrew overwhelmed by emotion—what emotion do you think that is?

Simpson: When Tom was writing it, I think he wanted to have two things going on. It’s a turning point in the episode. For David, he’s looking out the window of the bathroom and realizing that he’s trapped with Andrew. Maybe he could climb through the window and maybe he couldn’t, but he returns to Andrew. One of the things that’s happening for Andrew in that scene—and it’s one of the few times so far that we’ve seen any real emotion—the way Dan Minahan directed [Darren] to play it, and the way that Tom had written it, was the idea of: you’re watching the singer, David’s gone to the bathroom, and you’re feeling this sense of loss. You think he may have escaped. But either way, there’s an undercurrent of dread that you may have lost him no matter what. Darren wanted to get psyched up and do it in one take—you know, the slow push in that ends with him crying. And we gave him the space that he needed, and just did the long, slow push into the tear, and then he follows up with such joy.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2018/02/american-crime-story-aimee-mann-who-is-the-singer-listen-drive-the-cars-audio





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Last edited by Poppy on Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:56 pm; edited 3 times in total


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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story




I'm enjoying Towleroad's reviews, not just for the review itself, but also for the comments left by the readers. 





From acsversace-news:



Review of Episode 1.  "This is not the Dalton Warbler we once knew, that’s for sure."  :amused
Towleroad wrote:
The Beautiful, Bloody World of ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: ACS’ – Premiere RECAP

January 18, 2018

Whereas last season’s The People v. O.J. Simpson explored the complex (and widely discussed) racial component to Simpson’s trial and cultural impact, Versace aims to contextualize the Versace murder and the manhunt that followed within American culture’s understand/acceptance of gay men in the ‘90s

[. . . ]

. . . Little is confirmed when it comes to if — and how much — they [Gianni Versace and Andrew Cunanan] ever interacted before the shooting, so these scenes liberally apply some poetic license.

Still, Criss does an incredible job as Cunanan. He’s got the natural charm and charisma to believably sell this compulsive liar, but he’s also got the intensity to bring some menace to the performance. This is not the Dalton Warbler we once knew, that’s for sure.
Please visit the site to give the article a  number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.towleroad.com/2018/01/versace-recap/








About Episode 3:
TV Insider wrote:
Ask Matt: Revival Boom and 'Murphy Brown,' 'Victoria' vs. 'The Crown,' 'American Crime Story,' 'Ray Donovan' and More

February 02, 2018

Darren Criss may be hard to watch when Cunanan is at his worst, but it’s an electrifying performance.

Please visit the site to give the article a  number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.tvinsider.com/663667/ask-matt-murphy-brown-victoria-the-crown-ray-donovan/

















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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story




From acsversace-news:


haha.  That last sentence.  :amused  Also:  Well-deserved praise for Cody Fern.
Pure Fandom wrote:
The 4 best moments from ‘American Crime Story: The Assassination of Versace’, episode 2×04 “House by the Lake”

February 11, 2018

We was also introduced to upcoming actor of 2018, Cody Fern, who portrayed David Madson outstandingly and already has the public swooning over him. We must see him nominated for breakthrough actor of 2018 for this role or the world is doing something extremely wrong!

. . . This show is about remembering the loss of Versace and all of the fashion and glam he and his family provided, but we also need to sit down and remember the loss of Andrew’s other victims as well. If you do your research, all of these men gave so much to the world and need the recognition they was never given over two decades ago.

[. . . ]

It’s that time in my article where I once again have to describe Darren Criss’ portrayal of Andrew and once again, I can’t find a way to really sum up his talents. Darren is becoming more and more terrifying as the series goes on and you can’t help but be so mesmerised by his performances and how convincing he is as Andrew. All I’m going to say about Darren to finalise this week’s recap is, if I don’t see a photo of Darren struggling to carry all of the well-deserved awards that he wins in the coming months, did we ever really have a 2018?
Please visit the site to give the article a  number of "clicks."  Source:   https://www.purefandom.com/2018/02/11/american-crime-story-versace-2x04/







Review of Episode 2 (Warning:  Spoilers!):
Horror News Network wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ Episode 2 Review

January 25, 2018

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story maintains its momentum in Episode Two by elaborating on what worked so well with last week’s episode. Like its predecessor, The People v. O.J. SimpsonAssassination offers incredible characterization as it unfolds its exposition through the clever use of flashbacks and present-day storytelling.

Darren Criss is the star of the show with his scene-stealing portrayal of serial killer Andrew Cunanan. Episode Two spends much more time getting to know him, and this ends up being both hypnotizing and traumatizing for the viewer. Criss’ Cunanan projects a special blend of iron confidence and crippling awkwardness. In some public scenes, we get the impression that he could sell bottled water to a fish; but in his private moments we can see him grappling with the fact that his world is unraveling as a nationwide manhunt closes in on him. Depending on the scene and his company, Criss’ character is sometimes unassuming, sometimes charming, or sometimes terrifying. I suggested in my previous review that Criss sometimes takes a page out of Christian Bale’s book when he portrayed Patrick Bateman in 2000’s American Psycho, and I was utterly delighted when Episode Two ended with a scene very similar to Bateman’s “misunderstood” night club conversations. One thing’s for sure: regardless of his inspirations, Criss is delivering an extremely engaging performance of an otherwise detestable character for this program.

[. . . ]

The supporting actors of Assassination are all performing at the top of their game. Max Greenfield is particularly effective as Ronnie Holston, a young man who spends some time with Cunanan before his murder of Versace. Greenfield portrays the character with a certain level of vulnerability that causes the viewer to feel dread whenever the two are alone together. We know what Cunanan is capable of, and we just want Ronnie to make it out okay! Peggy Blow also holds her own opposite Criss in an appearance as Miriam Hernandez, the proprietor of the hotel serving as Cunanan’s temporary residence; and their scenes together are some of the most interesting parts of the second episode. A common theme here is that Criss’ excellent performance only gets better when he’s working with other actors, and Ryan Murphy and his team have selected excellent actors to bring out the best in Criss’ character.

[. . . ]

If The Assassination of Gianni Versace continues in this manner, Ryan Murphy has the second hit in a row with his American Crime Story franchise. I am deeply invested in the show’s story and characters, and I am eager to see which dark territories will be explored in next week’s episode!
Please visit the site to give the article a  number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.horrornewsnetwork.net/assassination-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-episode-2-review/






Episode 2 Review (Warning:  Spoilers!):
Into More wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ Episode 2 Recap: Andrew Cunanan and the Pink Speedo

25 Jan. 2018

As depicted by Criss, Cunanan is a performer, a chameleon. His life is whatever he needs it to be in the moment. But he’s not quite convincing enough. There’s always a seed of doubt there. He has to supplement his decent-but-insufficient storytelling skill with charm and sex appeal — hence the Speedo reveal.

Cunanan strips down to his bright, pink swimwear to take a shower on the beach, all while bragging about his connection with Gianni Versace. . . His story is clearly bullshit, even to someone as trusting as Ronnie. But when he’s fit, cute, and wearing not much clothing, it’s easy to be charmed by Andrew Cunanan.

Throughout the series, we’ll see men with sharp minds being won over by Cunanan, either sexually or merely to succumb to his will. In this scene, we see exactly how hypnotizing Cunanan can be when he properly mixes his tall tales with his impressive physique. With historical hindsight, we can question why anyone ever trusted Cunanan. We can see how flimsy his stories were. But devils don’t lead with their horns; they appear in forms most tempting. His darkness is seductive, shrouded in grand stories of brushes with fame and fortune. The greatest danger of a man like Andrew Cunanan is in how charismatic he can be.

[. . . ]

[At a club,]  He misses the designer, however, and instead ends up dancing with a random guy on the dance floor — yet another man entranced by Cunanan’s looks. This time, though, as the guy asks what Cunanan does, the killer’s chameleon colors fail him.

“I’m a serial killer,” he confesses. The guy questions him, confused. “I said I’m a banker!” Cunanan says. And then he breaks.

“I’m a stockbroker, I’m a shareholder,” he begins. “I’m a paperback writer. I’m a cop. I’m a naval officer. Sometimes, I’m a spy. I build movie sets in Mexico and skyscrapers in Chicago. I sell propane in Minneapolis, import pineapples from the Philippines. I’m the person least likely to forgotten. I’m Andrew Cunanan.”

Without his grand stories, the true Cunanan is laid bare: He’s a kid desperate to be remembered, to be interesting. History has remembered him, of course — not as a banker, or a stockbroker, a shareholder, or any of his other many disguises. In his desperation to be famous, he became infamous.

Please visit the site to give the article a  number of "clicks."  Source:   https://intomore.com/culture/The-Assassination-of-Gianni-Versace-American-Crime-Story-Episode-2-Recap-Andrew-Cunanan-and-the-Pink-Speedo/7ea0e27f33dd4785









EDIT:


From dcriss-archive:


Duncan Lindsay is Soaps Editor and Assistant Communities Editor for Metro.  Angelica Ross is an actor and Founder of Trans Tech social, which is a co-working and co-learning community dedicated to empowering trans, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer people and allies with career-ready skills.  Matt D'Ambrosio is a writer (The Vampire Diaries).  Anthony Smith is Senior Staff Writer (Mic) and producer. 






















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From Darren Criss Army:

Very eloquently stated, Darren!

darrencriss: On relating to someone like Andrew Cunanan - “Who doesn’t know what it’s like to feel unloved, or want to rise above your station, or just on a very simple level be liked?” #ACSVersace http://darrencriss.me/Esquire

via Darren Criss Army









americancrimestoryfx: Taking on a killer, face to face. 

Via Instagram, Feb 12 2018








From dcriss-archive:


Hmmm.  The ladies did not seem sure if they agreed with Darren when  he said "you've thought of it" (in terms of doing awful things like Cunanan did, but good judgment would intervene).   I thought what he said next was very nicely stated, about all of us understanding what it's like to feel emotions like fear, pain, longing, love, and disappointment.  I also really liked him saying that the thrill for him is to shed light on a story that few people know about.  And I thought he was very articulate  when he talked about how the next episode--which focuses on Jeffrey Trail, a gay man in the Navy, and the Don't Ask-Don't Tell policy and how that affected him--has a lot of significance and gravitas , given the current social climate.  Job well done, Darren!  applause thumbs up

Darren Criss on The Talk (February 12th, 2018)









JulieChen: Seriously, @DarrenCriss is killing it on #ACSVersace !! Thanks for hanging out at #TheTalk today :happy face :happy face









TheTalkCBS: What do you think of @DarrenCriss in #ACSVersace? We discuss his dramatic turn before dishing with #BBCeleb’s @ChuckLiddell! bit.ly/2BUVfTF









From acsversace-news:


This is great!  Live + 3 ratings for Episode 3:


Episode 3 of the Assassination of Gianni Versace gains 0.5 in the 18-49 demo for a 0.9 in Live+3 ratings. Source | 12 February 2018




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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story




From Darren Criss Army:

4 Your Excitement wrote:
4YE’s TV Reels Feels For February 4th Through February 10th

February 12, 2018


Top Episode

Clare:
While This Is Us’ “Super Bowl Sunday” was the ep that we have all been waiting for, and it was an exceptional episode, it was kind of what we expected from This Is Us. It is for this reason I’m going with The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’s “The House by the Lake”. This episode was shocking, horrific, painful, uncomfortable, and gut-wrenching. The performances by Darren Criss and Cody Fern throughout couldn’t be faulted. Criss continues his no-doubt award-winning performance, but Fern was the amazing find in this episode. He had me from his elevator scene with Jeffrey Trail (Finn Wittrock). Watch this episode if only for Criss breaking down during Aimee Mann’s cover of “Drive” and everything after this. Some of the best TV in the past year.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.4ye.co.uk/2018/02/4yes-tv-reels-feels-for-february-4th-through-february-10th/




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From dcriss-archive:


Impressive acting from both Cody Fern and Darren.  :happy face

ACSFX: The weight of lies become a burden for all. #ACSVersace

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This is a nice message.  Cody Carrera is an actor, singer & writer.  He was on Glee

codycarrera: Working with this guy I knew he was a great actor, but he is BLOWING ME AWAY this season of American Crime Story. His portrayal of Andrew Cunanan is the role of a lifetime and he’s killing it. I’m beyond impressed. I can’t wait to see each week as the story unfold what he does next. Great job Darren! #ISmellAnEmmyNomination #AndWin #DarrenCriss #AndrewCunanan #AmericanCrimeStory #TheAssassinationOfGianniVersace #TheAssassinationOfGianniVersaceAmericanCrimeStory #Glee






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From dcriss-archive:


This is nice--we get a date for the U.K.  Love Jon Jon's enthusiasm.  :happy face










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Sorry, I've been so busy the last 2 days.  It's late and I'm pretty tired, but here is a summary of my thoughts of the last episode (Episode 5):


Spoilers!

Spoiler:

--As with all the victims of Cunanan, the taking of Jeff Trail's life was heartbreaking.  Jeff was portrayed so sympathetically, as a man with integrity, who even though he realized he was not a powerful man in the Navy, he felt compelled to honor his own personal set of ethics.  This meant Jeff decided to save another gay man from being beaten to death, even though he must have realized doing so put him at risk of being "discovered' also to be gay, which is exactly what happened.  Likewise, because he felt strongly that he had to do what was right, he again put himself at risk by agreeing to do an interview with CBS news, revealing how the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy impacted the lives of gay persons serving the military. 
--The contrast of Cunanan's view and Jeff's view on whether Jeff should do the CBS interview was clear.  Jeff's code of honor meant he had to do what he could, in order to show the injustice of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy, whereas Cunanan looked strictly on how doing the interview would affect Jeff as an individual.
--In the scene in Jeff's apartment, where Jeff and Andrew's conflict comes to a head, Jeff tells Andrew Cunanan, that Andrew has no honor, that he doesn't know what Andrew stands for.  This is the core difference between the two men.  Andrew only acts when it benefits himself.  Jeff acts to do what is the right thing to do, the just and fair thing to do, according to his code of honor.  Even though the military has so cruelly betrayed Jeff, he still holds a great belief in the value of serving his country.  In the CBS interview, he said being in the military is his life.  It was what he has wanted since he was a small child (coming a military family).  Jeff also believes strongly in his family, even though he had not come out to his parents (but his sister supported Jeff--so sad that Jeff would not live to see his nephew or niece).  Andrew has no strong loyalties to anything.  He does not live his life according to a code of honor.  He lives solely to advance his own interests. 
--Jeff is very similar to Gianni Versace.  This episode has a parallel storyline with Versace struggling with his decision to give an interview with The Advocate, to come out as a gay man in a long-term, committed relationship with his partner.  Gianni argues with Donatella, where Gianni asks Donatella, is the brand (of Versace) braver than the man (than himself)?  He talks passionately of how, since he's been given a second chance of life after recovering from his illness, that he wants to live bravely, unashamed of who he is.  He believes coming out to the world is the right thing to do (even though Donatella tells him that it may have dire consequences to his business).   Jeff has similar reasons for doing the interview with CBS, in that even though he has his fears and doubts, he believes he needs to do the right thing, the brave thing. 
--However, the parallel storylines of Jeff and Gianni doing their respective interviews also shows the deep contrasts in the consequences of their interviews.  When Gianni calls Antonio to join in the interview with him, The Advocate interviewer (who we assume is gay) looks impressed, almost proud of Gianni and Antonio.  The interview is portrayed as going well, as a supportive environment, with Gianni feeling comfortable, cameras flashing in a nicely decorated luxury hotel.  On the other hand, (as Andrew had stated), Jeff conducts his interview knowing he will be portrayed with only his silhouette shown, as if sitting in the shadows, in a small room in a cheap hotel.  I interpreted this as meaning Gianni will continue to thrive in the world of fashion, whereas Jeff will be discharged from the military.  (But even with the discharge, Jeff has the satisfaction of knowing, he has made the honorable choice.)
--Both Jeff and David Madson felt obligated to Cunanan, because when in the past, they once were vulnerable and felt alone as gay men struggling to accept themselves, Cunanan reached out to them and offered them friendship and support.  But when both Jeff and David later called out to Andrew how Andrew was living a life of lies, and when Jeff screamed at Andrew that no one wants Andrew's love, it served to unsettle Andrew, making him progressively more unhinged, which led to Andrew feeling so "attacked" by the other men, that he felt it necessary to destroy them.  It was interesting to hear how often Jeff and David used the word, "crazy,  or words to that effect ("it doesn't make sense") to describe Andrew and also in talking to Andrew.
--It's clear visually how Andrew is not in sync with Jeff and David Madson.  Jeff and David, while waiting for Andrew to arrive at the airport, talk about Andrew, with David saying he feels sorry for Andrew, and Jeff saying Andrew has no one and nothing and how Andrew's life is based on lies. Jeff cautions David not to mention Jeff will be staying one night with his sister, because if Andrew finds out, Jeff thinks Andrew is "crazy" enough to just show up there.  Andrew's dramatic, saccharine voice exclaiming "the three amigos!" then cuts through David and Jeff's conversation (Andrew's voice, his mood, his feelings for Jeff and David, coudn't be more at odds with the feelings of Jeff and David toward Andrew). 
--Andrew's awkward proposal to David is another example when Andrew Cunanan is totally out of touch with other people, even these two men who he once was close to.  Andrew thinks he and David are in a committed relationship, which horrifies and astounds David that Andrew would presume this. 
--In the scene in David's bedroom, where he urges Andrew to ask for help, instead of telling "crazy" stories that are lies about himself (and David firmly saying again he will not marry Andrew), you see Andrew dissociating from David and from the moment itself. 
--the part at the club where David has to yell at Andrew  that he will not marry Andrew, and Andrew stood there, stunned and lost, with David walking away in frustration, made me feel sorry for Andrew.  He was maddening in how self-absorbed he was, how out of touch he was about other people's feelings, but he was a pitiful figure standing alone, confused, rejected, abandoned.
--the foreshadowing of death, of Andrew beating Jeff to death at a later time, when Andrew was viewing Jeff's interview with CBS on the tape, with Jeff talking about the gay man being beaten, and how Jeff has often dreamt of letting that man die (so that Jeff would not be discovered as gay).  Andrew reached out to touch the TV screen, touching a point on the image of Jeff's head.   Then I presumed Andrew shot the TV. 
--another powerful episode showing another good person whose life Andrew Cunanan would take later.  But this time, with the episode going back to an earlier time, I felt more for Andrew when he was vulnerable after being rejected by David.


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Spoiler:


--I closed my eyes for the part where Jeff Trail tried to cut out his tatoo, because Jeff feared the tatoo will identify him as gay, but geez, the amount of physical pain he must have had to endure to hide this from the military.  It's so sad to imagine his level of desperation and fear, that he would resort to physically cutting out a part of himself
--the scene where Jeff tried to commit suicide is heartbreaking.  Again, the deep degree of desperation Jeff must have felt, the level of despair that must have been experienced by gay soldiers--due to the  homophobia of the military.  This is the second example of institutionalized homophobia we've seen (the first being homophobia among law enforcement )
--this episode stood out because it was the first episode where the viewers saw longer scenes of one of the victim's lives before meeting Andrew Cunanan.  I'm glad that we given this backstory of  Jeff Trail, this brave man who tried his best to live by his code of honor.  True, he stated in the CBS interview that he regretted saving that other gay soldier's life, because if he had done nothing, he would not have been suspected of himself being gay.  But I'm not sure-- if he was given the chance to go back in time, if he would have done anything differently--because he still chose to draw public attention to the plight of gay soldiers in the military by agreeing to do the CBS interview.  That was his second act of bravery, another instance of Jeff Trail living by his own personal code of conduct--regardless of the military's own rigid, unjust, discriminatory regulation.




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From Darren Criss Army:



Warning:  Episode 4 spoilers!  Cody Fern and Darren are so good!


The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | Season 2 Ep. 4: Phone Call Scene | FX

(Source: youtube.com)







Entertainment Weekly wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace star Finn Wittrock on his heartbreaking role as Cunanan victim Jeff Trail

February 14, 2018


How was that final fight between Jeff and Andrew to shoot? How was it working with Darren?

I remember that being a hefty day. It was a lot of dialogue and a lot of heated stuff. We kind of played with the temperature of how much is it an all-out battle. He’s a very easy partner to dance with. He likes to explore it and try different ways and try one way hotter and one way colder. It was a fun conversation in that way. It’s really interesting to watch him work. He was kind of playful on set and I know from playing some f—ed up people it can be a survival mechanism to kind of stay light when you’re not in it because otherwise it can kind of eat you.
Source:  http://ew.com/tv/2018/02/14/assassination-gianni-versace-finn-wittrock-jeff-trail/




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From Darren Criss Army:


This is a fascinating interview with Darren.  He is extremely thoughtful, analytical and articulate.  It's fascinating to hear Darren break down Andrew's need to be needed by others, which is expressed by Andrew offering support to and acceptance of men like Jeff Trail, when Jeff really needed to be accepted (since Jeff was struggling, as a gay man serving in a homophobic military).  Darren also notes one of Andrew's failings:  His constant need to be in control.  Thus, Andrew needing help from others was antithetical to him  remaining in control and dominant.   I think Darren expressed himself very well when he discussed the issue that, unless you were gay and in the military during  that time period, you cannot really comprehend the day-to-day struggles that someone like Jeff would have to endure.  But Darren also adds he hopes that this episode may help people learn about the real struggles for many men and women in a similar situation.  It's so interesting that they shot Episodes 4 and 5 together in chronological order as much as possible.  As someone who had a week between 4 & 5, I feel that now that I have gotten to know and care about David Madson, to now view Episode 5, I'm already guarded and hating Andrew for what he did in Episode 4 (the brutal way he killed Jeff, followed by rage-filled killing of David who was trying to convince Andrew to spare him).  So in Episode 5, it did come as a surprise to me that I could feel some sympathy for Andrew when he seems vulnerable (mostly in the scene where David yells at Andrew that he won't marry Andrew and Andrew stands on the dance floor, confused, sad, lost, and abandoned).  I think this is the largest risk of the inverse chronolgy-structure of the show.  Over Episodes 1-5, our dislike, maybe even hatred, of Andrew continues to build and grow as we see him murder 5 good men.  I wonder if some people may be very turned off.  I wonder if some people will not be able suspend their bias against Andrew, when they come to the episodes of Andrew in his earlier years.  However, as I stated before, I can say that I did feel compassion for Andrew in Episode 5, so I'm interested in how I feel about Andrew in the next episodes. 

Here is an excerpt--it's so long because I just loved so much of what Darren said in this interview (so thought-provoking, so insightful and eloquent)--but please go to the site to show our interest in all things related to Darren, and give the article a number of "clicks."  Thank you!   thumbs up  Warning:  Spoilers!
The Hollywood Reporter wrote:
'Versace': Darren Criss Opens Up About the Revealing "Don't Ask Don't Tell" Episode

February 14, 2018

Before the midpoint of FX's The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, the narrative of serial killer Andrew Cunanan's life had been told in reverse chronological order, devoting episodes to each of the murderer's victims.   But the fifth episode, titled "Don't Ask Don't Tell," lives up to the promise creator Ryan Murphy made to shed a light on institutionalized homophobia in the 1990s, juxtaposing the coming-out stories of two of Cunanan's victims with the moment the killer unravels.

Darren Criss,
who plays Cunanan, spoke with The Hollywood Reporter about the pivotal episode, and how it helps fuse the past few episodes of the series — which have focused on Cunanan's victims Lee Miglin, David Madson, Jeffrey Trail and William Reese — back with the titular fashion designer. "Don't Ask Don't Tell" follows the struggle of military man Jeff Trail to come to terms with his sexuality while Versace toys with the idea of publicly revealing his own relationship status. Their two very different experiences — one leading to Trail's discharge from the service and the other leading to a high-profile piece in a national magazine — are both in conflict with Cunanan's spiral about his identity and self-worth.

. . . [Criss states,] "Two different worlds are trying to face the same obstacles and being met with very different resistance is really interesting because you can see this very harrowing world that Jeff is in constant conflict with versus this very ... glamorous side of the coin, which would be Gianni's side. There's a real heroism to both."

[. . . ]

It's interesting to see Andrew there for Jeff when he needs help accepting his identity as a gay man, but Andrew's entire trip to Minneapolis to see David and Jeff is a cry for help and he won't accept any from either of them.

Andrew has this savior complex, which is why I think he really thrived so much in a place as complex as San Diego in the '90s because you have a vibrant gay scene right on top of the vibrant military town. So it's sort of built-in conflict within a lot of young men who Andrew meets. Andrew stands for everything that these men would find attractive — not in a sexual sense but in a personality and joie de vivre sense, the guy that is now offering refuge and a place to celebrate what would otherwise be a source of conflict for them. It was a feeding ground for someone like Andrew to feel needed in a really fulfilling way.

[Andrew] has many tragedies, but one of his biggest tragedies is that I think he needs to be the purveyor of everything. He needs to be in control. He has to be the one that is buying the drinks, throwing the parties, introducing people. He needs to be the one that is giving the help, and as a result I think his output is so high that nothing goes in. And so his own help system, as far as gaining help, is manifested by only being able to help others. He just gives himself away to so many people to the point where he can sort of cover up his own shortcomings by being this constant giver.

Finding somebody like Jeff is sort of the gold mine Andrew gravitated toward. Even though he was really helping out Jeff — and he really does in a very earnest, beautiful way, I think — Jeff was also unconsciously there to help Andrew, just to give him some kind of purpose because he needed to feel love. So their meeting was very tragic.

Watching this episode from the perspective of someone who might not have really understood the nuances of the "Don't Ask Don't Tell" military policy at the time, what can you say about how the episode might have enlightened you?

Even if you are of an age where this is something that you were aware of, unless you were gay and in the military at the time, I feel like there's no way you'd have the same insight or experience as somebody like Jeff or his peers. You really can't have a shot at working with what that actually means on a day-to-day basis. It's a continuing question and struggle for our brothers and sisters in arms and people who serve our country. I think maybe hearing the specifics of Jeff's particular story hopefully will make this more accessible to people and seem a little more real, and seeing the real struggle that it presents for a lot of young men and women.

[. . . ]

In the next three episodes that you have seen, what did you learn about Andrew and what are you looking forward to audiences learning about him?

I was always interested in Andrew's life as a teenager because it's always easier to identify with a young person that has so much more time to go. I think, inevitably, when you know somebody has done something as terrible as Andrew did, you connect every moment of their life to those actions. Any little thing he did in high school, "Well that's, you know..." Now you look at it differently because you know that they've committed murder. It's interesting in looking at a really gifted, young, talented kid and just really exploring how fun and charming he was. A lot of the grim atmosphere that he was breathing in towards the latter part of his life, I really, really wanted to make sure that we couldn't connect that dot to the dots of his youth.

We shot a lot of stuff that I thought was really fun and showed just an honest-to-goodness, lovable teenager. I don't know if that all made it into the show, but I remember those scenes and I really enjoyed being able to paint those colors of Andrew. I had to wait the entire shoot to be able to finally show these more affable colors. . . . I couldn't wait to get him as a teenager because I really wanted to confuse people's senses of who and what you're rooting for.

[. . . ]

That's the person that I was really hoping to create and that's what makes this structure interesting. It's like Merrily We Roll Along. You start with them at their worst, and how do you feel about them when you see them at their best? It's pretty divisive. It's either going to make you really mad, or its just going break your heart that there was such a loss of potential there. The memorable parts for me was just showing a kid that's just trying to figure out his life like every other kid.

The end of this "Don't Ask Don't Tell" episode saw Andrew and Jeff fighting about honor, which really seemed to be what set Andrew off on his killing spree.

[. . . ]

. . . You have, basically, Jeff calling Andrew out. Not too dissimilar from what had happened in the last episode, where the thing that set Andrew off on David was [David] finally calling [Andrew] out for what he was and basically making Andrew live inside a world that is real and therefore not very pretty.

Any time Andrew is forced to be exposed to the real world around him or the truth, it's a very unpleasant thing for him. So that set him off in the last episode, and ultimately ended with a fight in the car and very rageful homicide. That was the second of the murders. So the first one — "no one wants your love" is the line that Jeff says. And that's enough to turn a cog in Andrew's brain. . .

He's giving so much of himself to people that they now have to feel beholden to holding him up. And so it's sort of emotional hostage — you're now feeling entitled to someone's life because you've given them something that they didn't ever really ask for. That's a pretty big awakening point, for Jeff to realize that this guy is unconsciously using him. And he calls that out, the truth that Andrew's not ready or emotionally prepared to hear or deal with. And if he can't have something, he has to take it and he has to destroy it.

He couldn't have Jeff; he couldn't have David; so he had to literally take it. He couldn't have Versace's fame, success, everything, so he tried to take it. Even to take someone's car. So when Andrew is deprived something, the ultimate way to really take it back and be in control is to be more powerful, and to be the controller of that person's life.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/acs-versace-star-darren-criss-interview-dont-ask-dont-tell-episode-1084601









Spoilers!   I do disagree with this writer in that the show did portray institutionalized homophobia in law enforcement, as well homophobia in the military.
Enstarz wrote:  
‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’: Darren Criss Shares Thoughts On ‘The Assassination Of Gianni Versace’ Episode 5

Feb. 15, 2018

Before The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story hit screens, series creator Ryan Murphy promised a deep dive into the homophobia of the 1990s. Thus far, he hasn't really delivered, focusing instead on serial killer Andrew Cunanan's life as it unfolds in reverse chronological order, relative to each of his victims.

At the midpoint of the series, episode 5 titled "Don't Ask Don't Tell," finally lived up to Murphy's promise. The series took a major swerve by cleverly juxtaposing the coming out stories of two of Cunanan's victims, Jeff Trail and Versace himself, against the moment the killer unravels.

Two very different experiences of coming out are offered, as Versace prepares to pose for his Advocate cover while army man Jeff Trail gives an interview to CBS News about gays in the military, with his voice and identity kept obscured, in order to protect his career.

Up to now, Criss, who is most famous for his squeaky-clean Glee character, has shown serious range in tackling arguably the most challenging character of his entire career as Cunanan. As for the decision to showcase both sides of the coming out coin, Criss considers it a genius move.

"Two different worlds are trying to face the same obstacles and being met with very different resistance is really interesting because you can see this very harrowing world that Jeff is in constant conflict with versus this very ... glamorous side ... There's a real heroism to both," explained Criss.

Playing An American Psycho


As for what audiences will learn about Andrew in upcoming episodes, Criss was hopeful his past wouldn't impact the audience's reading of the character too much.

"When you know somebody has done something as terrible as Andrew did, you connect every moment of their life to those actions. ...I couldn't wait to get him as a teenager because I really wanted to confuse people's senses of who and what you're rooting for," he said.

When it comes to empathizing with the killer, Criss believes it's possible to do so.

[. . . ]

Criss is widely considered to be doing the best work of his career on the show, and will surely be a shoo-in once the Emmys roll around.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:   http://www.enstarz.com/articles/203283/20180215/don-t-ask-don-t-tell-darren-criss-shares-thoughts-on-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-episode-5.htm










Variety wrote:
Why Laura Branigan’s ‘Gloria’ Is the Perfect Song for an On-Screen Crime Scheme

February 16, 2018

Asked why the song serves so well as an accompaniment to insanity, the now-retired producer [ Greg Mathieson] posits: “I think they used it because of the juxtaposition of evil intent and the feeling that the song gives you, which is to get up and dance and have a good time. They’re trying to set up this dichotomy of pumping yourself up.”

[Versace music supervisor Amanda Krieg] Thomas concurs that Branigan’s “Gloria” provides “a great contrast when it’s surrounded by darkness” but there’s also the lyrical content about a person, like Cunanan, who is hiding in plain sight. “‘Gloria, You’re always on the run now.’ …
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://variety.com/2018/music/news/laura-branigan-gloria-darren-crissy-assassination-gianni-versace-i-tonya-1202701882/









The use of "Gloria" and "Drive" was soooo fitting!  The lyrics match the mental landscape of Andrew during specific moments of the show perfectly!  More lyrics of "Gloria": 
"I think you've got to slow down before you start to blow it/
I think you're headed for a breakdown, so be careful not to show it." 

And:
"Gloria (Gloria), I think they got your number (Gloria)/
I think they got the alias (Gloria) that you've been living under (Gloria)/
But you really don't remember, was it something that they said?/
Are the voices in your head calling, Gloria?"

And more lyrics to "Drive": 
"Who's gonna tell you when it's too late/
Who's gonna tell you things aren't so great/
You can't go on thinking nothing's wrong/
Who's gonna drive you home tonight?/
Who's gonna pick you up when you fall/
Who's gonna hang it up when you call."
Refinery 29 wrote:
Uncovering The Spoilers Buried In The Music Of American Crime Story: Versace

February 15, 2018

"Murphy is such a fan of music, and for many of the moments, he knew what he wanted. 'Gloria' was one of those; he’s a big Laura Branigan fan," Krieg Thomas said, which is probably not something anyone has said in decades. . . "It works really well on many levels — it’s so incongruous with what just happened, he’s murdered people, he’s driving, and we hear this happy, upbeat song," Krieg Thomas continued. She noted that the lyrics speak to what is happening: "Gloria, you're always on the run now / Running after somebody, you gotta get him somehow" and "Gloria, don't you think you're fallin'? / If everybody wants you, why isn't anybody callin'?"

[. . . ]

In episode 4, the foreshadowing is heavy when Madson and Cunanan are in a bar listening to Aimee Mann sing the saddest version imaginable of "Drive," a morose uber-hit for the Cars in the '80s. Madson's tears along with the lyrics, "Who's gonna pay attention / To your dreams? / Who's gonna plug their ears / When you scream?" let us know that there was no escape. Not to the outside world where gay men were vilified, and not with Cunanan on a Bonnie and Clyde-esque murder spree.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.refinery29.com/2018/02/190590/assassination-of-gianni-versace-soundtrack-american-crime-story-music?utm_source=twitter










From dcriss-archive:


American Crime Story 2x06 Promo “Descent” (HD) Season 2 Episode 6 Promo | Source









acsversace-news:

Still of Darren Criss in episode 5 of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | 15 February 2018




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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story



From Darren Criss Army:


Spoilers!  
Enstarz wrote:  
‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’: Darren Criss Shares Thoughts On ‘The Assassination Of Gianni Versace’ Episode 5

Feb. 15, 2018

Up to now, Criss, who is most famous for his squeaky-clean Glee character, has shown serious range in tackling arguably the most challenging character of his entire career as Cunanan.

[. . . ]

Criss is widely considered to be doing the best work of his career on the show, and will surely be a shoo-in once the Emmys roll around.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:   http://www.enstarz.com/articles/203283/20180215/don-t-ask-don-t-tell-darren-criss-shares-thoughts-on-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-episode-5.htm









From dcriss-archive:

 


Via Paul Wontorek’s Instagram Story (February 15th, 2018)

via dcriss-archive




















Justin Staple is video and music producer at Vice.













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*Jeremy*

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Andrew was a bit likable in this episode, it's a first time. And you could actually "see" Darren through the character.

ACS Versace seems to be like Star Wars : you firstly meet the villain and, then, you return in the past to see how he became a villain. 

The rest of the episode was about homophobia in the 90's. Interesting but depressing.

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Jeremy wrote:
Andrew was a bit likable in this episode, it's a first time. And you could actually "see" Darren through the character.

ACS Versace seems to be like Star Wars : you firstly meet the villain and, then, you return in the past to see how he became a villain. 

The rest of the episode was about homophobia in the 90's. Interesting but depressing.


Yes, I agree, Andrew is a bit more likeable in this episode.  He seems more human, more vulnerable in some scenes (mostly when David rejects him in the dance place).  And in the scenes in the earlier years, when he first meets Jeff in the bar, he is kind to Jeff (even though Andrew has a pattern of making people feel obligated to him because of these acts of kindness).  haha.  I still don't see Darren in the character, but I did see friendliness and warmth of Andrew when he first met Jeff, when Jeff was feeling very low about himself.

haha.  I like the comparison to Star Wars.  It made me sad to see how cute was little Anakin Skywalker, knowing who he would become later. 

Yes, the homophobia in this episode was heartbreaking.  That scene where Jeff tried to take his own life was so intensely sad.  Finn Wittrock's acting got to me in that scene.   It was just so hard to see how painful it was for Jeff to be serving in the Navy when everyone in the military was so hostile to him because they suspected he was gay.  How tragic was it that he left the Navy (I'm assuming he was discharged, but I don't know if that's what really happened), when he said in that CBS interview, that being in the military meant so much to him.  Agreed, a very interesting, enlightening episode, but very tragic, given how Jeff first had to battle homophobia in the military, only then to have Andrew take his life.





From dcriss-archive:



Interesting interview where Darren speaks about Andrew Cunanan.  I really like how Darren phrased that, like us, Andrew also had parents, dreams and hopes, and regrets and failures, and that it is important to try to understand what events/factors may have led Andrew down a different path, a destructive path. 

Darren talking about “The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” in the Daily Mail Weekend | Source

via dcriss-archive









Another interesting article, discussing Andrew Cunanan, and Darren taking on this role (short discussion of his previous role on Glee and in Hedwig and the Angry Inch).  Warning:  Spoilers!
Blended Mag NYC wrote:
Departure from Glee: Darren Criss' Creepy Performance as Andrew Cunanan in the Versace TV Drama

February 16, 2018

The 31-year-old, Emmy-nominated actor, singer/songwriter, and performer stole all of our hearts when his breakout role of Blaine Anderson appeared on Glee for the first time. He sang a breathtaking rendition of Katy Perry’s "Teenage Dream," and episode after episode his charming smile and gentle persona made us all swoon. Nowadays, he is taking on the role of Gianni Versace’s killer, Andrew Cunanan -- a stark contrast to the fun-loving and adorable Blaine.  . . And while longtime fans of Criss always knew that he had the capability to branch out and do more serious roles (see: Hedwig in Hedwig and the Angry Inch on Broadway), much of the world was shocked to see him portraying a villainous murderer.

The show is a dark look into the life of Cunanan, who Criss plays with empathy and humanity. "It’s my job to be empathetic. If I set out to paint him as a monster, then there’s no point in telling the story. This isn’t a Bond villain," he said to USA Today. In many recent interviews on the show he explains that as an actor, it’s important to look at the sides of the character that can be related to you.

In Criss’ case, there are many similarities between him and his character -- Cunanan was a seemingly nice, charismatic guy who everyone loved when he was young. He chose to put his desire for fame and jealousy of others into unspeakable means. Criss is also charismatic and kind, loved by all -- but he chose to channel his passions into making a positive change in the world. He wanted to make people smile and share his talent with those who would listen. And if he hit a roadblock, he would push forward and do his best to move onto the next step. In Cunanan’s case, he would not move forward. According to the show, he would hold onto the past and hurt those that stood in his way. In the FX Behind the Scenes video below, executive producer Brad Simpson explains that Cunanan maybe wasn’t "destined to be a murderer, but has an unstable personality and was put on that path."



Much like Criss, Cunanan also shared many similarities to Gianni Versace, which the show points out in many different circumstances. The very first episode illustrates the beauty of Versace, the stunning mansion he lives in, and the lavish lifestyle he leads. In contrast, Cunanan lives in squalor, almost, lying to everyone in his path to make them think he’s richer and more successful than he actually is. But again, he has passion like Versace, he just chose to hurt rather than heal with it. He was an individual who needed excess amounts of help, but he never asked for it. He may have even known he needed the help, but when people offered he refused -- more accurately, he reacted in a way that was not only overpowering, but harmful and destructive. In an interview with the Hollywood Reporter, Criss speculated, "...when Andrew is deprived of something, the ultimate way to really take it back and be in control is to be more powerful, and to be the controller of that person's life." That was his ultimate downfall.

[. . . ]

Unfortunately, the show is a fictional retelling of events by majority. It’s unknown how Cunanan went about murdering the people he was so close to since his relationships with them and the only dots we can connect are the ones spoken by people that knew him. But as a viewer of the show and a fan of Criss himself, it is so interesting to see the roots of his talent come out in a way we as an audience have never seen. Glee had many emotional scenes between Blaine and Kurt Hummel (his boyfriend, best friend and soon-to-be-husband), and Hedwig was a show that encapsulated love, heartbreak, anger, and joy through incredible acting, singing and choreography (this was probably Criss’ most well-rounded role that showed every part of his skillset). But his portrayal of Andrew Cunanan makes the audience feel not only afraid, but uncomfortable, embarrassed, and sometimes find themselves empathizing with the complex character.

Taking on his life and becoming a creepy, evil figure while acting out real-life events that are chilling to the bone is something that Criss is doing an award-winning job of. He deserves all the praise, and we can only wait patiently to see what he’ll do next.

Lead Image Credit: Darren Criss / Instagram


Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.blendedmagnyc.com/culture/2018/2/16/departure-from-glee-darren-criss-creepy-performance-as-andrew-cunanan-in-the-versace-tv-drama









From acsversace-news:


This is very nice, for Episode 3, the Live + 7 ratings is 1.1 (versus 0.4 for the Same Day/Live viewing).

acsversace-news wrote:Episode 3 of the Assassination of Gianni Versace gains 1.939 million viewers and 0.7 in the 18-49 demo for a total of 3.201 million viewers and 1.1 in the 18-49 demo in Live+7 ratings.

TV by the Numbers wrote:
‘The Alienist’ doubles in cable Live +7 ratings for Jan. 29-Feb. 4

February 15, 2018







Source:   http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/dvr-ratings/cable-live-7-ratings-for-jan-29-feb-4-2018/


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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story




From acsversace-news:


I've been wanting to mention this, about Episode 5.
Spoiler:


I don't know if you can see it, because it's a little small, but the scary shrine set up in Cunanan's closet of his apartment that he abandoned before flying to Minneapolis, has a pic of Antonio standing behind Gianni Versace (with Antonio's hand affectionately on Gianni's shoulder), but Andrew replaced Antonio's face with his own.  The writer of this article also noted the pics are from The Advocate interview that was largely a focus in this episode. 


Source:   http://previously.tv/american-crime-story/blood-on-the-dance-floor/














Source / Link to article








Some of these reviews don't specifically focus on Darren's performance in Episode 5, but these reviews may still raise interesting points, so I'm including some excerpts from them.   Warning:  Spoilers!
AV Club wrote:
A devastating episode of American Crime Story is the season’s best yet

Grade:  A-

February 14, 2018

If there’s one prominent problem with the majority of true crime narratives, it’s that they put the focus entirely on—or grossly glorify—the criminal rather than spending time with the victims. The approach makes sense because that’s often what people want: the gory details, insight into a murderer so we can try to put together the “why?” puzzle pieces. Interest in the victims is secondary and cursory: limited background details, just enough to let us know how we can possibly avoid that same fate. While The Assassination Of Gianni Versace certainly is heavy on Andrew Cunanan, an episode like “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” proves why victims’ stories are important, too—and the result is this season’s best episode so far.

"Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” brings Versace back into the mix by juxtaposing him publicly coming out (in Advocate) with Jeff Trail’s struggles of being closeted in the Navy.. . .  Versace’s mind won’t be changed; he had “a second chance” after he got sick but survived, and he wants to live openly. Jeff, too, wants to live openly but that’s impossible with his career in the Navy, and more so during the height of the Don’t Tell Don’t Ask days.

That policy, which wasn’t repealed until late 2011, is indeed the focal point of an episode that is both powerful and heartbreaking. After Andrew watches a video of Jeff’s appearance in a 48 Hours episode dedicated to DADT, the episode smartly puts the killer on the back burner for a while to instead jump back to 1995. The bulk of the hour is about a crucial period during Jeff’s time in the Navy, starting with him breaking up a fight between a straight officer upset that another officer “brushed up against me” and then, later, stopping gay bashing in his bunk. The targeted officer cries to Jeff that he needs to be reassigned; he knows that there’s a target on his back, and he knows that there won’t always be someone around to intervene. Another officer spots the two of them, and the intimate moment is cut short by the realization that Jeff just made himself a target, too. The scene is informed by the 48 Hours interview where Jeff tells the story of saving a sailor’s life. “If I hadn’t done it, if I hadn’t stopped them, no one would have suspected me.” And then the kicker: Jeff dreams of taking that moment back.

Since that moment, Jeff has lived with the knowledge that saving one person essentially derailed his own life. . . . There was no winning for him, so he chose the self-sacrificing route. This doesn’t just speak to his character as a fellow gay officer, but also to his base qualities as a caring human being, which makes everything even harder to watch because we know the outcome.

Through Jeff, “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” shows the horrible implications and consequences of the titular policy. It forced members of the military to stay in the closet, to lie about their lives, to spend all their time in the service living in fear that they could be outed—or attacked just for being suspected of “homosexual activity”—and kicked out. It also allowed some officers to encourage others to out their colleagues and, in some instances, it forced gay military members to turn on others in order to save themselves. One officer, the episode shows, was cut a deal by the military police: If he outs the gay military officers he knows—through tattoos, because he doesn’t know their names—then he won’t get dishonorably discharged. . .  And sure enough, there’s an immensely upsetting scene where Jeff tries to carve off his tattoo.

. . . setting up Jeff’s aborted suicide by hanging. It’s a testament to how powerful and effective the storytelling is in this series: We know that’s not how Jeff dies, but I still held my breath. But in a way, some of Jeff did die while in the Navy.

Another impressive task the episode pulls off is having Jeff’s military experience seamlessly lead to depicting why he was originally so drawn to Andrew (a stark contrast to two years later in the airport). Andrew clocks Jeff as new to the gay bar scene, and he uses this to position himself as a charming, knowledgeable, comfortably out gay man, and one who is willing to welcome Jeff. What Jeff craves—what he doesn’t get from the military—is to be open about who he is and accepted for it. Andrew doesn’t just accept him but celebrates him, even paying for all of Jeff’s drinks that night. It’s easy to see the magnetism that drew Jeff to Andrew, the beginnings of their friendship before it went awry, and why Jeff now feels like he “owes” Andrew. . .

[. . . ]

Stray observations

--Both Cody Fern and Finn Wittrock have been tremendous these last two weeks! ACS really kills it when it comes to casting, huh
--Here’s a link to the Dignity & Respect manual if you want to flip through it—I couldn’t bring myself to really dive in because, as a queer military brat, this episode was especially rough to watch for me. . .
--It was good to see Versace & co. back this episode! I’m glad the series included the Advocate interview, which I know was important to Ryan Murphy.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://tv.avclub.com/a-devastating-episode-of-american-crime-story-is-the-se-1823013048








Vice wrote:
Episode Five of 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace' Is More Brutal Than Real Life

Feb. 15, 2018

“Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” alternates between the weekend of Trail’s death in 1997 and two years earlier, likely because it was convenient to juxtapose his story with that of Versace’s Advocate interview. In truth, Maureen Orth writes in Vulgar Favors that Jeff met Cunanan and sat for an anonymous interview with 48 Hourssomewhere around 1992-93. “Whether people like it or not, there are gays in the military,” Trail told reporter Richard Schlesinger in the heartbreaking conversation. “They’re very top-notch performers. They know what they’re doing. You’re gonna weaken our national defense if you remove gays from the military. And you’ll never be able to do it 100 percent—it’s just whether or not you’re gonna continue to hunt us.” Schlesinger later recalled that Jeff “had absolutely nothing to gain by doing the interview. Yet he took the risk and spoke out. My colleagues and I left San Diego very impressed with Ensign Trail.”

Trail had grown up as the conservative oddball in a close, liberal Midwestern family. Friends and teachers remembered him as clean-cut and warm, with a strong code of ethics.
Source:  https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/mb57mn/american-crime-story-assassination-of-gianni-versace-episode-5-recap?utm_source=vicetwitterus









Warning:  Spoilers!  More analysis of Andrew Cunanan and Jeff Trail, and homophobia in the military.
Decider wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’ Episode 5 Recap: Navy Blue

Feb. 15, 2018

Jeff and Gianni’s fates following their respective interviews were as divergent as their accommodations and their sisters, yet Andrew finds something equally infuriating about both. His beef with Versace is obvious enough. The stalker-wall of newspaper and magazine clippings that Andrew maintains, many of them about Gianni’s life as an out and proud gay man with his longtime partner Antonio, indicates resentment. Why should this man have it all, while Andrew has to lie about fame and fortune and can’t find anyone who loves him back?

Jeff, by contrast, is a crash-and-burn case. The military’s discovery that he was gay has left him “a washed-up queer in a shitty job and a shitty condo, bitching about how you could have been somebody,” as Andrew cuttingly puts it. “You’re not wrong about that,” Jeff replies fatalistically — he won’t even bother to deny it. Of course, you’re not wrong to see shades of Andrew himself in that description, except insofar as he has no job and no condo at all anymore, not even shitty ones.

[. . . ]

Watching Jeff’s final confrontation with Andrew prior to the murder is painful, then, both because of what he gets right and what he gets wrong. “I don’t know what you stand for,” he shouts at Cunanan. “I don’t know who you are. You’re a liar. You have no honor.” Correct on all counts — possibly lethally, so if you figure this contrast in their outlook is a big part of what drove Andrew to kill. But when Andrew rightfully points out that he believed in and supported Jeff while his beloved Navy treated him like shit — “I saved you!” — Jeff bitterly retorts “You destroyed me. I wish I’d never walked into that bar. I wish I’d never met you.” He says he wants his life back, as if Andrew took it from him, instead of Bill Clinton and Uncle Sam. Andrew does take his life away, eventually, mere hours from that moment in fact. But in a sense, he was just an accessory after the fact. Jeff signed his own death warrant the moment he decided, in the face of society’s hatred, that some principles are worth fighting for anyway.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://decider.com/2018/02/15/acs-versace-episode-5-recap/









Spoilers!   Interesting analysis of Cunanan, which I agree with.

Refinery 29 wrote:
ACS: The Assassination Of Gianni Versace Episode 5 Recap: "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"

February 14, 2018

Homophobia has been lingering in every episode of this season of American Crime Story, but “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” gave it the explicit attention it deserves

[. . .]

It’s intentional that the name of this season is “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” because Murphy has been explicit that he sees Cunanan’s murders as politically motivated, since he went out of his way to out people and often humiliate them. The idea of sending a gay person’s parents a postcard (like the one poor Trail had to grapple with) is so obscenely inappropriate it makes my blood boil. In previous episodes, Cunanan exhibits internalized homophobia, but it seems to show in more emboldened ways with each passing episode. When Cunanan is talking with Trail, he says people will only see him as a “f*ggot,” and I’ll admit that I was shocked to watch the words leave the Glee star’s mouth.

[. . .]

It’s irritating to watch someone like Cunanan push the limits of regular friendship and hospitality so far with Trail and his ex David Madson (Cody Fern). Cunanan is also sometimes just bitchy and hearing him say things like “when I found you” makes me uncomfortable, because Cunanan has this manipulative way of acting like he “made” people, and that they owe him big time. He actually pushed it even further and says, “I saved you.” It feels like the most outright egomaniacal he’s been. . .

. . . The probable psychopath [Andrew Cunanan] even manages to make eating cereal look evil. . . . I’m torn because the more time this show spends on more normal people outside the Versace family, the more it seems grounded in reality. I almost couldn’t listen to Trail’s family’s voices on his voicemail. The final words of the episode were successfully realistic, and that much more disturbing.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.refinery29.com/2018/02/188167/assassination-of-gianni-versace-recap-episode-5-dont-ask-dont-tell







EDIT:  I added a few more articles:


From acsversace-news:


Discussion about homophobia in the '90s and analysis of Andrew Cunanan.
Oxygen wrote:
'American Crime Story' Episode 5 Unexpectedly Tackles Violence Against Gay Men In The Military

February 16, 2018

Trail’s deep shame over his sexuality, like Madson and Miglin, was the source of his relationship with Cunanan — who, in Murphy’s narrative, fed off his victims’ melancholic regrets like a vampire. It would have been easier to depict Andrew as a purely manipulative monster, stalking wounded prey. Instead, Murphy shows him as desperate and drawn to the bleeding — not only out of a desire to manipulate and dominate, but also to end his loneliness.

Although the ‘90s are often seen as somewhat of a paragon of socially liberal progress, the cruelties of that decade are washed away in the waves of nostalgia from the past few years. Cunanan’s narrative, . . .  highlight not only the immense nastiness foisted upon sexual minorities in our recent history, but also the heartache (and violence) of living in a world designed around queer persecution and forced isolation.
Source:  http://www.oxygen.com/crime-time/american-crime-story-episode-5-tackles-violence-gay-men-military










From Darren Criss Army:

Vox wrote:
A wrenching episode of American Crime Story exposes the cost of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell

Feb. 18, 2018

“Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” is an unrelentingly wrenching hour. So much of it hangs on the terrifying precipice Jeffrey had to keep from falling over every day in the Navy, and his barely restrained fury at an institution he loves mistreating him so badly, before finally pushing him into the abyss of Cunanan’s rage.

[. . . ]

More than anything, this episode highlights the value of the approach writer Tom Rob Smith has taken to American Crime Story, giving depth to Cunanan’s victims who didn’t make many headlines at all before they counted Versace among their number, and more broadly, exploring the very real dangers of homophobia.  “The Assassination of Gianni Versace is not the detailing of a murder spree as much as it is a taxonomy of gay tragedy,” as Richard Lawson wrote in his review for Vanity Fair. “It illustrates the maiming effect of the    closet . . .

[. . . ]

“Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” is The Assassination of Gianni Versace’s most overtly political hour, explicitly laying out the traumatic effects of its titular policy and condemning the system that put it in place. When it digs this deep and this personal, it’s hard to argue the power of the series’ blunt-force approach to gay trauma — especially not when the history it’s retelling isn’t so long gone after all.

Being reminded that this sanctioned homophobia is much closer in our rearview mirror than it may appear, and in fact still exists in other forms today, is harrowing. But it also makes for a heart-stopping, crucial piece of television storytelling that rightfully recasts America’s history of homophobia as a violent and unforgivable crime.
Source:  https://www.vox.com/culture/2018/2/18/17017214/american-crime-story-versace-dont-ask-dont-tell-recap-review








From dcriss-archive:














Bruno Gunn is an actor.  Jack hardwick writes for the Daily Star.








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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story





From Darren Criss Army:


I'm waiting until I finish the series before I decide if I favor or do not favor the reverse-chronology structure.  I do agree that part of Episode 4 (the scenes taking place in David Madson's apartment in "House by the Lake") played to me and my hubby like an episode from a show in the horror genre, with the dark lighting, the dramatic, ominous music, the camera angles.   The scenes in Episode 4 that felt the most real to me, were the scenes taking place outside David's apartment.   I think there are a couple of inaccuracies in the article.  Gianni Versace was the fifth victim, not the fourth victim (first was Jeffrey Trail, then David Madson, then Lee Miglin, William Reese, and then Gianni Versace), and the writer states the first 2 murders (of Jeffrey Trail and David Madson) occur in Episode 3 ("A Random Killing"), but the first two murders that Andrew Cunanan commits, of Jeffrey and David, occur in Episode 4 ("House by the Lake").
Collider wrote:
Why ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Is Not the Show You Think

February 19 2018

Murphy and Smith are offering a terrifying portrait of a killer in the vein of American Psycho. The show’s tonal touchstones have far more in common with that film or Alfred Hitchcock’s iconic Psycho than they do with any kind of wealth porn or hagiographic story of celebrity.

The series is also really zeroing in on Cunanan’s struggles with his homosexuality, and how that contrasts and compares with Versace’s experience as a gay man—albeit one of wealth and fame. Cunanan . . . worked as an escort for older, oftentimes wealthy men living in the closet, and the show posits that his jealousy and disgust may have been motivating factors in what led him to kill.

[. . . ]

The show’s third and fourth episodes are largely contained, playing out almost like mini horror movies—especially Episode 3, in which we stick with Cunanan in real-time through his first two murders. . .

All of that said, Versace still hasn’t reached the heights of The People v. O.J. The fractured/Memento-esque narrative is compelling at times, but it can also be frustrating, and to be quite honest the Versace-centric portions—at least thus far—lack a certain “oomph” that the rest of the show seems to have. The very best reason to be watching Versace is Darren Criss, who delivers an absolutely phenomenal and terrifying performance as Cunanan. This is a multi-dimensional, complicated, and bold performance as Criss can turn Cunanan’s personality on a dime, in a manner that’ll send chills down your spine.

And thus far, it’s [Versace is] a fascinating and downright disturbing one.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://collider.com/why-assassination-of-gianni-versace-is-not-the-show-you-think#darren-criss








EDIT:  Added another review, and a tweet.  :happy face


From acsversace-news:

Go Fug Yourself wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace Recap, Episode 5

Feb. 19, 2018

I have to be honest and note that I felt this episode was a little bit of a structural mess — with the caveat that it’s still remarkably well-acted, and “a little bit of a structural mess” for this program is the equivalent of giving a kid on the honor roll a B+. It’s still something to be proud of, but that kid might be a little irritated that you didn’t just hand over  the   A-. . .

I also highly recommend Vulture’s fact-checking of each episode, especially for episodes like this one, where I often wondered how much was fact and how much was supposition. It seems that everyone in real life is still in the dark about why Andrew hated Jeff Trail as much as he did, or what happened between them — because everyone who knew the answer died, I suppose. . .

[. . .  ]

Other thoughts, before we look at some visuals: Finn Wittrock, as I mentioned, was amazingly good in this episode, and Jeff Trail’s story broke my heart. I found the scenes of his suicide attempt, and his attempt to remove his own tattoo, as painful to watch as anything I’ve seen on TV in a long time; he is heartrending in this. Cody Fern, who plays David, is also excellent in this episode (although last week was more of an acting tour de force for him, naturally). And Darren Criss is just great. He is so chilling in that scene wherein he’s going through Jeff’s stuff and puts on his dress whites; it says something that it’s just terrifying to watch him put on a hat and watch a video tape. I don’t know that this show is getting as much buzz as The People Vs. OJ Simpson — what has? — but I hope the acting is recognized, because it’s really superb.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.gofugyourself.com/assassination-gianni-versace-recap-02-2018

 






From dcriss-archive:

Jennifer Leggio is a writer for ZD Net.









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