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The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

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Poppy

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A few items I didn't get a chance to post earlier.


From acsversace-news:


This is nice.  Glad folks are watching on iTunes!  :happy face


All 5 episodes of The Assassination Of Gianni Versace are currently in the top 10 on the iTunes US TV charts | 18 February 2018










For Episode 5:

Source









Twitter trend (Episode 5):

Source




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From dcriss-archive:



Warning:  (Pics) Spoilers!







Episode stills of Darren Criss and Michael Nouri in episode 6 of The Assassination Of Gianni Versace (February 20th, 2018) | Source








Familiar faces:  Lee Miglin, David Madson, Jeffrey Trail



dcriss-archive:
Episode stills of Darren Criss, Mike Farrell, Cody Fern and Fin  Wittrock in episode 6 of The Assassination Of Gianni Versace (February 20th, 2018) | Source









acsversace-news:
Inside Look: Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell | There’s a story in their secrets. Go behind the scenes with the cast and crew for a look at 90’s prejudice against gays. | 21 February 2018
via  dcriss-archive









He is Executive Director, Global Fashion & Retail at Esquire Magazine & Esquire.com :happy face


Via John Wattiker’s Instagram Story (February 20th, 2018)

via dcriss-archive








From Darren Criss Army:

I think Darren says it well here:  “It is my job to humanize him, but the hope is that we’re not glamorizing anything.”  I don't see this as glamorizing Cunanan for the murders.  I think the show tries to express how the world has suffered a loss with the loss of each of these men's life.  (Although I think it's fair of media and others to note the degree of violence shown on the series--I would have preferred the murders to have been treated as they were in in the first season, The People v. OJ Simpson.)
People wrote:
Darren Criss on Playing Gianni Versace's Murderer: 'It Is My Job to Humanize Him'

February 21, 2018

After years of being known as preppy singer Blaine Anderson on Glee, the actor takes a dark turn in American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace as Andrew Cunanan — the serial killer known for shooting the Italian fashion designer on the steps of his Miami mansion and murdering four other men in 1997.

“I had a friend tell me when I got the part, ‘You’re playing the gay boogeyman,’ ” Criss, 31, tells PEOPLE in this week’s issue, on newsstands Friday. “I was like, ‘Excuse me?’ He was like, ‘When he was on the run, we would all spook each other [by saying] Andrew Cunanan is going to come get you.’ The things that are said about him in the show aren’t crazy.”



When it came to playing Cunanan, Criss wanted to make sure he was portraying all of the complex aspects of his character, which included everything from killing in cold blood to singing Laura Branigan’s “Gloria” at the top of his lungs in his car.

“Human beings are so complex,” he says. “We are capable of so many different emotions and the reasons behind those emotions. I’m not asking people to empathize or pardon anything that Andrew has done, but I do like people unconsciously figuring out how much they can relate to this person whether how little or how much.”

He adds: “It is my job to humanize him, but the hope is that we’re not glamorizing anything.”

The series, which is based on journalist Maureen Orth’s book Vulgar Favors, starts with Cunanan’s murder of Versace and moves backward through his killing spree. While viewers have now seen how all of Cunanan’s murders went down, Criss promises that scenes of his younger years are soon to come.

“That was some of the most fun stuff for me,” he says. “With someone like Andrew, I don’t think he had homicidal tendencies as a teenager. He was a lovable, fun, smart, gifted kid and it is confusing and heartbreaking and mortifying for people that knew him at that age to think he’d be capable of something like this later.”

[. . . ]

Since taking on the role of Cunanan, Criss says people started to come up to him to share their stories about him.

“When he was alive, he literally was everywhere in the sense that he knew people, people knew him and he made himself the life of the party,” Criss says. “Even after he gained this degree of infamy that augmented his persona, people would have stories about him or think they saw him.”

Though the show has been met with its fair share of controversy — the Versace family slammed it as a “work of fiction” in January — Criss says he can understand why.

“I don’t blame anybody for having any reaction to this,” he says. “I mean, that’s their family member on TV. It’s completely understandable. You just hope the work speaks for itself and some good is brought through this.”

For Criss — who announced his engagement to his longtime girlfriend, Mia Swier, on Jan. 19 — the show’s success couldn’t come at a more exciting time.

“Some actors have to wait a lifetime for this kind of stuff,” he says. “This happened exactly when and how I would have liked it to happen in my life.”

He continues: “I just hope I don’t blow it from here!”

American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace
airs Wednesdays (10 p.m. ET) on FX.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://people.com/tv/darren-criss-gianni-versace-american-crime-story/









From acsversace-news:


edgarramirez25:  Reminder: #ACSVersace will return NEXT WEEK with a brand new episode. Until then, catch up on previous episodes on FXNOW

[LINK IN BIO]  Recordatorio: #ACSVersace volverá la semana que viene con un nuevo episodio. Hasta entonces, ponte al día con episodios previos en FXNOW [LINK IN BIO] Lembrete: #ACSVersace retornará a semana proxima com um novo episódio. Até então, pegue os episódios anteriores no FXNOW [LINK IN BIO]

*FXNOW link

*FX Now link:  http://www.fxnetworks.com/shows/american-crime-story









:happy face
Darren Criss Army wrote:Episode 4 of the Assassination of Gianni Versace gains 0.5 in the 18-49 demo for a total of 0.8 in the 18-49 demo in Live+3 ratings.

TV by the Numbers wrote:
‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’ and ‘Curse of Oak Island’ top cable Live +3 ratings for Feb. 5-11

February 19, 2018



Top 25 cable shows (including ties) in Live +3 adults 18-49 for Feb. 5-11, 2018

Source:  http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/dvr-ratings/cable-live-3-ratings-for-feb-5-11-2018/





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From Darren Criss Army:



The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | Inside Look: Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell | FX

(Source: youtube.com)



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From dcriss-archive:


This is a very interesting interview with Cody Fern.  I have really enjoyed his acting in Versace so far.  I'm glad he has been given the chance to act--it sounded like he may have felt stifled creatively in the little town he grew up in, and what he was doing before career-wise.  Interesting what he said about acting with Darren, about how Darren is often improvisational.  Finn Wittrock also had mentioned Darren liked to try approaching a scene hotter versus colder, and vice versa.
Collider wrote:
Cody Fern on the Unique Career Path That Led Him to ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace’

February 22, 2018


What’s it like to go from the set of Gianni Versace to the set of House of Cards? Is it nerve-wracking to be a part of the final season of a show?

. . . With Versace, Tom Rob Smith wrote an episode, and I got to work with (director) Daniel Minahan. You’re so supported that any nerves go out the window because you know everyone is there to do their best work, and everybody is supporting you and rooting for you.

[. . . ]


You weren’t on a path to becoming an actor. You were on the path toward a very different career. Had you always wanted to be an actor and just didn’t pursue it, or was there something that sparked that desire and got you to take that chance?

FERN: It was impossible for me to pursue, to be honest. I grew up in a town with just under three hundred people in Western Australia. . . acting is not a possibility. University feels like a world away. I went to uni and I studied commerce on a scholarship, and that was crazy and wild, in and of itself. I was never exposed to acting. I think the first real play I saw was when I was 22, and the first time I ever acted, and it wasn’t professionally, was when I was in 24, and that was in acting class. The concept of acting wasn’t something that was possible, but I’ve always known that I wanted to do it because I’d watched so many films and I was so engaged with them. It was an internal driving force, but it wasn’t a possibility. The short version of the story, in terms of whether there was a moment, really came from seeing Cate Blanchett in Elizabeth. That was the moment, as a teenager, that I really understand that this was what I wanted to do. . . .  If I was going to do the thing that I loved so much, than I needed to do it. It wasn’t about wishing and dreaming and hoping. I actually needed to do it. That’s what changed everything.

One of the things that’s always true about everything Ryan Murphy is a part of is that he pushes all of his actors in ways that even they might not realize they’re capable of and they all get a chance to shine. How did your experience on American Crime Story change you and make you grow, as an actor?

FERN: That’s a great question. So much is said about Ryan being a creative genius, which he absolutely is. The word “genius” is thrown around too much and too often, and it should be reserved for people like Ryan. But then you meet Ryan, and you realize that not enough is said about how kind, how generous and how down to earth he is. He’s this mythological figure. When you meet him and you get to work on one of his shows, you’re already bringing everything inside of you – all of your skill, all of your talent and all of your willpower – because you’re working with Ryan Murphy and you know he’s the very best. You know that he’s the real deal. And then, he gets the best writers and the best directors. Daniel Minahan, who directed Episode 4, “House by the Lake,” and Episode 5, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” is such a brilliant director, and that support structure was there. The thing that I’ve learned, working on this production, in terms of growth as an actor, is that it really is about risk. Ryan encourages you to risk everything. . .

It’s a state of mind, in acting. You have to risk being in a dangerous place, emotionally. You have to risk everything for the person that you’re in the scene with and you have to give everything up to the story. You’re working with a real person, on Versace. This is a person who was really murdered and whose story needs to be told. Viola Davis said that you exhume the body and tell those stories because they’re the stories that we need to hear, and you feel a responsibility to that. The thing Ryan does is trust you. He employs the very best people. Having somebody like Ryan put his faith in you, you bring your very best. I don’t think you’d last a day on set, if you weren’t bringing your best. Working on Versace, I learned to risk everything, to risk looking stupid and to risk everything, and to not leave anything behind. I learned to give everything over. You may fall and you may fail, but if you fail, he’s gonna be there to catch you and the material is gonna be there to catch you. You can’t fall very far. You’re not falling into concrete.

You had Darren Criss and Finn Wittrock to go through this with, and the work that the three of you did together is truly remarkable. How did you find the experience of working with them?


FERN: They’re so incredible. They’re such incredible people. Darren’s work is phenomenal. The thing about working with Darren is that he’s so off-the-cuff and improvisational within the material. I don’t mean that he’s making things up. Darren can give you 500 choices for delivering one line, and each of them can be true, so you really have to be on your toes with him. He keeps you alive, in the moment, because you don’t know how where he’s gonna go or how it’s gonna be played. That’s thrilling, as an actor. You can’t fall into the place of just giving a response that you’ve rehearsed. You don’t have that luxury, working with Darren. You’ve gotta be alive, in the moment. That is a real gift. And we just got along so well. It was the same with Finn. Finn is a very specific actor and he’s incredibly grounded in his work. The three of us knew the relationship between these three men. We start with the death, so we’re at the most intense point of the story, and then we get to unravel it backwards. We were all discovering it together. To build back, to a time and place where they were friends, they were lovers, and the times were golden, was great because we got to build that relationship as friends and chemistry is everything.

Since Ryan Murphy has a knack for getting his hooks into actors and not letting them go. Are you game to jump into any other world that he might have a role for you in?

FERN: I would work with Ryan, again and again and again and again, until the end of time. I know that that’s the way that everybody feels, working with Ryan. To work with Ryan again, I would jump into whatever world he wants me to. When you see the work that Sarah Paulson, Kathy Bates, Jessica Lange and Evan Peters have done, it’s incredible to see the roles that they’ve gotten to play. Denis O’Hare is one of the most underrated actors of his generation. I loved what he did in Hotel. There’s no way that I wouldn’t work with Ryan again. I mean, it always depends on the role and the script, but at the end of the day, I would work with Ryan again.
Please visit the site to give the article an umber of "clicks."  Source:  http://collider.com/cody-fern-interview-assassination-of-gianni-versace/#house-of-cards








She is an actor.










From acsversace-news:

Nice increase via Live + 7 for Episode 4
TV the the Numbers wrote:
‘Assassination of Gianni Versace’ posts more big gains in cable Live +7 ratings for Feb. 5-11

February 22, 2018


“American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace” continued to be a strong performer in the Live +7 rankings for Feb. 5-11.

Episode 4 of the FX series grew by o.6 points (0.3 to 0.9) in adults 18-49 with a week of delayed viewing, tied for the largest adults 18-49 gain of the week. Its total-viewer bump of 1.79 million people ranks second behind “The Alienist” (1.8 million), and “Versace” also ranks at or near the top of the percentage-boost charts.
Here are the top cable shows in the Live +7 rankings for Feb. 5-11, 2018. Rankings include original series, movies and specials only, not repeats.

Adults 18-49 – total gain








Source:  http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/dvr-ratings/cable-live-7-ratings-for-feb-5-11-2018/










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Critics' Reviews of The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story


From acsversace-news:

Note:  Warning:  Each article may contain spoilers!



Wow, this writer is passionate and eloquent.  Very personal and heartfelt article. 
Good Is wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Is Subversively Brilliant

February 21, 2018

Halfway through its run, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace” — the second installment of the “American Crime Story” series on FX — is arguably the most important show on television right now. The title suggests that the series will focus on Versace’s murder. Instead, esteemed producer/creator Ryan Murphy uses the assassination as a starting point and framework to showcase the other men that Cunanan killed before Versace and, by doing so, manages to capture the degradation that a generation of gay men had to endure during the intensely homophobic 1990s.

[. . . ]

With his latest effort, Murphy continues to hold up a mirror to society.

“No one wants your love,” [Jeff] Trail screams, breaking free. We watch as Cunanan takes this in, his eyes filling with the realization that no matter how hard he tries, the world will never grant him the love he’s seeking.

So many traumas are highlighted in this series, first and foremost the suffocating fear that kept so many in the closet, including successful real estate tycoon Lee Miglin, whose wife managed to convince the police to label his murder a “random killing,” to Versace (Edgar Ramirez) himself, who kept his decade-plus relationship with Antonio D’amico (Ricky Martin) a secret. But the indecencies hardly end there. We witness an FBI that seems indifferent to the murder of gay men. Words like “fag” and “queer” are used casually in everyday conversation. Men are gay-bashed, refusing to report their abuse for fear of being fired. The nonexistence of civil rights whatsoever, much less marriage equality. Together these elements contribute to a culture of hostility and fear that makes gay people feel not just like second-class citizens, but less than human.

Palpable in almost every scene is the rage Murphy and writer Tom Rob Smith feel about this history. That the events we’re witnessing happened only some 20-odd years ago seems almost surreal.

I empathize with this rage.

Watching the show has triggered me, as I’m once again confronted with just how much shame and discomfort I was suppressing in my mid-20s. Now, looking back from the relative comfort of 2018, I can see just how much was stolen from us. Popular culture has predominantly chosen to frame the LGBT rights movement as a cheery march of progress toward acceptance. Here, Murphy chooses to remind us, much as he did with his adaptation of “The Normal Heart” for HBO — Larry Kramer’s harrowing play about our government’s silence (and our nation’s indifference) to the AIDS crisis — of just how awful things once were.

What makes the show so brilliant, and subversive, is how Murphy conveys his moral outrage through the sadistic exploits of Cunanan. Here is where Criss is shockingly effective: simultaneously disturbing and charming, arrogant and desperate for love, his Cunanan is a pathological liar, a status seeker, a sad and dangerous human being. But he’s also the one who seems least troubled by his sexuality, someone willing to be open about being gay and to want, even demand, to be loved. By having Cunanan consistently shunned by men who are less comfortable with their sexuality than he is, Murphy seems to suggest that the brutality of the late ‘90s was bound to create a monster like Cunanan — evil, no doubt, but also a byproduct of a society that deliberately refused to allow gay men to self-actualize and live normal lives.

With “The Assassination of Gianni Versace,” Murphy has taken on something more personal, and the effect is both chilling and prescient: He dares us to look and then not look away.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.good.is/articles/assassination-of-gianni-versace-lgbt







Horor News network wrote:
‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story’: The Horror News Network Mid-Season Review

February 21, 2018

Halfway through its intense and diverse season, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story manages to out-“American horror” American Horror Story and claim the prize as one of the most engaging shows on television. Between its expert storytelling, its incredible actors, and its flawless delivery of social commentary, the series manages to exceed expectations each and every night.

[. . .]

What’s even more impressive is the filmmakers’ tendency to explore the nuances of Cunanan’s victims in favor of constant exploration of Cunanan himself. The last couple of episodes focus entirely on Cunanan’s non-famous victims, and they explore their circumstances with an empathetic and engaging retelling of events. Criss is incredible in his American Psycho-esque delivery of a performance no one is likely ever to forget, but Assassination is careful to always keep in mind that Cunanan is the villain of this story. While we get inside of his head from time to time- not unlike Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer Cunanan is never glorified or portrayed as anything but a depraved monster. This process allows the audience to truly understand the circumstances of the victims of these senseless crimes and to never root for Cunanan as one might for a fictional “heroic” killer like in Dexter. Showrunner Ryan Murphy and company have an obligation to the victims of this real-life story not to sensationalize a tragic event, and it is clear that they have approached this responsibility with care.

. . . Because these characters are based on real people who lived through real events, the series delivers its social commentary naturally, in ways which resonate with the viewer. This show is flat-out scary at times. Criss plays a convincing and terrifying killer, and viewers can’t help but cringe when we know where a certain scene is headed. . .

[. . .  ]

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story successfully juggles a variety of haunting storylines and ideas in a way that’s sure to please fans of Murphy’s other works . . .  The show represents modern television at its finest, and viewers are in for a treat if its second half is as incredible as its first!

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.horrornewsnetwork.net/assassination-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-horror-news-network-mid-season-review/









Bloody Disgusting wrote:
Cunanan, Portrait of a Serial Killer: “American Crime Story” Details Real Life Horrors

February 21, 2018

Of course, there was also Darren Criss as the charmingly deceptive dandy, Andrew Cunanan. . .

On “Glee,” Criss showed a lovable charisma as “the boy next door.” Here, he takes that built-in expectation and flips it on its head. Criss’s Cunanan can walk into a room and captivate an entire crowd as he weaves one unbelievable tale after another. . . Andrew has never met an alternative fact he didn’t like. . . It’s a complex character whose murderous inclinations, as of so far, haven’t fully been explained. Nonetheless, it’s Criss’s portrayal that makes it seem believable even if the motivations has yet to crystallize.

[. . . ]

. . . He isn’t content just to kill Lee Miglin, he needs to destroy his legacy. . .  In this period of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (also dealt with devastatingly in a later ep) and a general stigma of depravity associated with homosexuals, the idea of being “outed” is more terrifying than death itself.

“The Assassination of Gianni Versace” is powerful television that brings to mind the gut punch psycho-thrillers of the 80’s such as Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer and Maniac. Much like those films placed their psychotic villains as central characters in order to reflect the societal temperament of the time, so too does this season’s “American Crime Story.” And, while Ryan Murphy might exist as a polarizing storyteller who often allows excess of style to outweigh his narratives, “The Assassination…” just might be the perfect marriage of his trademarks. . .

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://bloody-disgusting.com/editorials/3483725/cunanan-portrait-serial-killer-american-crime-story-details-real-life-horrors/








City Beat wrote:
‘Versace’: True-Crime Drama at its Best

Feb. 20, 2018

Not only is 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story' the follow-up to the excellent 'The People vs. O.J. Simpson,' it's even better

Similar to how The People vs. O.J. Simpson featured a limited amount of Cuba Gooding Jr.’s Simpson, this season is really about Cunanan. . . Cunanan was a chameleon — he exhibited the unique ability to significantly alter his appearance with just a pair of glasses and haircut — and could be very charismatic and convincing. The same can be said of actor Darren Criss, who nails Cunanan’s manic, psycho killer ways. Cunanan wasn’t a skilled murderer, but he was a deranged one — one who managed to evade authorities for months. Getting to know Cunanan’s background and what makes him tick — as much as can be understood — makes him all the more terrifying.

Where The People vs. O.J. Simpson delved in to the larger race issues of the time, The Assassination of Gianni Versace contemplates the implications of being gay, particularly for men in the 1990s. . .

But being a wealthy celebrity, Versace saw some privileges that most gay men at the time did not experience. Cunanan’s first victim was a former U.S. naval officer who we see struggle with “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” and gay-bashing in the military. Cunanan himself used his sexuality to take advantage of and manipulate people. He frequently befriended wealthy, older men — sometimes closeted men with wives and families — and bragged about the lavish gifts he’d receive. In a split second, he’d hold the arrangement over their heads as a threat.

Iconic figures and lesser known real-life characters come to life thanks to a phenomenal cast. Criss will undoubtedly receive award attention for his role; the Versace siblings are uncannily portrayed by Édgar Ramírez and Penélope Cruz. Ricky Martin’s take on D’Amico is surprisingly solid. Other supporting actors like Finn Wittrock and Max Greenfield (regular players for producer Ryan Murphy) and newcomer Cody Fern give fantastic performances, if only for an episode. The top-notch acting, paired with colorful, extravagant sets, thoughtful storytelling choices and a spot-on soundtrack make this season a feast for the senses.

Versace is truly Murphy at his finest — it’s scarier than American Horror Story, with dark humor à la Nip/Tuck and dotted with his signature camp featuring a heavy dose of glamour and the grotesque. And yes, I think it’s better than Simpson.

The TV giant just signed a five-year, $300 million deal with Netflix (one of the biggest in TV history), but that doesn’t mean Murphy’s many 20th Century Fox projects are making the move or getting cut short. American Crime Story will continue for at least two more seasons, which will focus on Hurricane Katrina and the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal; his other projects American Horror Story, Feud and 9-1-1 all have new seasons in the works. As if he isn’t already, Murphy is about to be everywhere, but let’s hope he focuses on quality, not quantity. Because when he’s on his game, he can produce a work of this caliber — one that’s not to be missed.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:
https://www.citybeat.com/movies-tv/tv/article/20993251/versace-truecrime-drama-at-its-best



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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"



A few more reviews.  Some of the reviews don't specifically mention how they view Darren's performance, but the articles may make other interesting points, such as an analysis of Andrew Cunanan, and/or comments regarding social homophobia.   Warning:  Spoilers may be present in the articles!


From acsversace-news:



Vulture wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace Recap: I’m Coming Out

February 14, 2018

Finn Wittrock does an excellent job showing Jeff’s pain and struggle, just as Darren Criss and Cody Fern have both been spectacular in the past two episodes. It’s going to be a really tough Emmy race if they wind up duking it out with each other. . . the differences between these coming out stories is key to understanding exactly how and why Versace’s death happened, and I’m glad the show is drawing those unique parallels.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.vulture.com/2018/02/acs-versace-recap-season-2-episode-5.html








Harpers Bazaar wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace Episode 5 Explores Andrew Cunanan and Jeff Trail's Complicated Friendship

February 14, 2018

In the four episodes we’ve seen so far, he’s [Andrew Cunanan is] a murderer, but in “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell,” he is merely the most extreme Stage Five Clinger ever witnessed onscreen. His ability to completely ignore social cues and boundaries is breathtaking and deeply stressful. The portions of this episode that I spent hiding behind my hands were not the ones you’d expect; . . . Cunanan’s proposal of marriage to a horrified Madson, or his desperate attempts to insert himself into Madson’s life.

[. . .]

This episode shows us, for the first time, a genuinely charming Andrew Cunanan.


Seeing Cunanan in the past also illustrates how far he’s fallen in the present. The only thing he ever had to offer was being entertaining and charismatic, and it got him a long way. Now that he’s making everyone around him deeply uncomfortable, there’s really no way back for him.


But in this bar, it’s completely clear why Trail would be drawn to Cunanan. He’s intriguing and fun and worldly without being intimidating, and he gently makes fun of Trail’s admission that this is his first time at a gay bar. Before they start talking, Trail is so overwhelmed that he almost walks right back out of the bar, but Cunanan makes this muscular, aggressively neon-lit world seem welcoming. . .Trail thanks him for “stopping this night from being a humiliation,” . . .

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/film-tv/a17887322/assassination-of-gianni-versace-episode-5-recap/









Daily Break wrote:
"The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story" Episode 5: The Cloud Hanging Over Everyone

Feb. 15, 2018

Then there’s Cunanan. Does he have an internal shame he’s not outwardly expressing? Is his self-hate the true reason for his murder spree? It’s still not clear if his anger stems from insecurities about his own sexuality, jealousy over the success of others, or his rejection by both Trail and Madson. The man is such an enigma I feel like we still may never know his heart – or lack thereof.

We’ve come a long way from the '90s – gay military personnel now serve openly, a celebrity’s sexual orientation barely makes headlines and gay marriage is now legal. But it’s not over yet and if this show does not solve Cunanan’s case, it still gives us an insight into the LGBTQ community we may not have been aware of. And for that, it is valuable.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.dailybreak.com/break/american-crime-story-versace-episode-five-dont-ask-dont-tell?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_content=organic










The Ringer wrote:
In ‘The Assassination of Gianni Versace,’ the Camera Stays on the Victims

Feb. 14, 2018

However, what makes Versace a unique presence in an ever-crowded television landscape [of TV shows focusing on killers] has less to do with its Nolanesque chronology or its insidious killer than it does how much attention the show dedicates to the people who were killed, the lives that were affected by these murders, and how a society plagued with systemic homophobia enabled Cunanan to claim five total victims — culminating in the death of Gianni Versace (Edgar Ramírez) on the steps of his opulent mansion. By devoting screentime to Versace and Cunanan’s lesser-known victims — with the exception of William Reese, whose death was the result of a man being in the wrong place at the wrong time — the show empathizes with the discrimination each faced as a gay man in ’90s America and the institutions that failed them. In Versace, there’s more than one killer.

[. . . ]

Cunanan leverages this rampant homophobia against both Trail and Madson. He sends Trail’s family a letter addressed to him that heavily implies their son is gay while he’s still closeted, trying to force his hand. And after killing Trail in Madson’s apartment in “House by the Lake,” Cunanan convinces Madson that calling the cops is the worst possible idea — he’s a gay man with a dead body in his apartment, who are they going to believe? — and that they need to run off together. Cunanan preys upon these men’s insecurities, using society’s homophobia as a trap, while also seemingly lashing out because of it.

Trail, Madson, the Chicago real estate developer Lee Miglin (Mike Farrell) from Versace’s third episode — these are tragic figures, undone by shame brought upon by outdated norms. Seeing them broken down in reverse chronology, knowing they’ll fall victim to Cunanan, makes it all the more heartbreaking. That Versace devotes the time necessary to show how these characters were victims — specifically to a rage-filled spree killer and more broadly to a repressive society — speaks to what the series cares about. Versace could luxuriate in the violent, sociopathic tendencies of Cunanan, or, as more befitting of creator Ryan Murphy, envelope itself in Versace’s elegant, campy world of fashion, but it doesn’t. . .the series’ intentions — much like its time-bending narrative — are a particularly unique sight on television, and especially among crime shows.


Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  https://www.theringer.com/tv/2018/2/14/17013584/assassination-of-gianni-versace-acs-alienist-victims










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From dcriss-archive:


Season 2 of American Crime Story, “The Assassination Of Gianni Versace” will be available in Spain, March 30th on Netflix. | Source












acsversace-news:
@BBCTwo“Some people would kill to be famous.” #ACSVersace starts Wednesday 28 February, 9pm, @BBCTwo.
via dcriss-archive





















blaindersonkummel:
American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace - UK Promo

Pics 1, 2 + 3 - Radio Times

Pics 4 + 5 - TV & Satellite Week

Pic 6 - Total TV Guide

Pic 7 - What’s on TV








Yea!  Darren in People Magazine.  :happy face

Darren in People Magazine | Source




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An article by the person who wrote the screenplay, Tom Rob Smith.
Telegraph UK wrote:
20 years on, why are there so many unanswered questions about Gianni Versace's murder?

By Tom Rob Smith

24 February 2018

On the morning of July 15 1997, Gianni Versace was shot on the steps of his Miami mansion.

[. . . ]

. . . I was approached by Brad Simpson and Nina Jacobson, producers of American Crime Story, to write a mini-series about the events leading up to it [Versace's murder].

Far from being asked to dramatise a famous moment of history, the challenge felt closer to being asked to solve an untold mystery.

And so it was that, three years ago, I heard the name Andrew Cunanan for the first time, the young man with an IQ of 147, once full of promise and potential, who was ultimately responsible for five savage murders. ​Did he know Versace? It seems that they’d met in San Francisco four years before the murder. But what had happened between them?

When I asked Orth what had drawn her to the case in the first place, she answered that she’d seen a photograph of Cunanan, a handsome young man, wearing black tie, and it struck her that he seemed such an unlikely killer. This is the question at the centre of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: not who did it – there’s no doubt about that – but why he did.

Many killers display disturbing patterns of behaviour that go back many years. They’re violent, abusive, cruel to animals. Arson is a repeating indicator for a troubled psychology. If you had told Cunanan or his friends that, at the age of 18, he was going to be a notorious and despised killer, they would have found the idea impossible to believe.

Cunanan was a gentle boy with a high-pitch voice, mocked for being gay, an effete Oscar Wilde-like figure at his school, who used his wit to deflect the homophobic taunts he regularly received. His father, Modesto, had been born in the Philippines, joined the US Navy, earned US citizenship, came to America to live the immigrant dream of success, joining Merrill Lynch and using his handsome salary to send Andrew to one of the finest schools in the country: Bishop’s in La Jolla, San Diego.

Cunanan read widely, delighted in art and literature. He liked to laugh; even more, he liked to make other people laugh. He recited Robin William’s monologues to his friends and family. He wanted to impress people. He wanted to be happy. He wanted to be loved.

[. . . ]

But Versace’s was a vibrant success story, about the particular nature of an individual’s brilliance, not a crime story; those are about the nature of society – in this case, the destruction wrought on so many by homophobia. How do you survive in a society where many consider your existence to be a crime?

[. . . ]

Cunanan had been on the FBI’s Most Wanted list for more than a month before the designer’s death, and was believed to be on the loose in the Miami Beach area. Why was the local community not warned? Why did it take his suicide, eight days after he shot Versace, to put an end to the killings? 

[. . . ]

In many ways, the Aids crisis offers a parallel to Cunanan’s killings: gay men had been left to die while the world looked the other way, and it was only once a celebrity died that the world took action.

Source:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/20-years-many-unanswered-questions-gianni-versaces-murder/



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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"


From acsversace-news:



The Times-UK wrote:
The week’s best TV: Assassination Of Gianni Versace; Pets — The True Cost; Dispatches; Sunset Boulevard

February 25, 2018


PICK OF THE WEEK

Assassination Of Gianni Versace


Wednesday, BBC2, 9pm


Following the success of the Bafta-winning The People v OJ Simpson, the second season of Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski’s American Crime Story strand zones in on the events surrounding the 1997 murder of the Italian fashion designer and the subsequent bungled hunt for his killer, the Californian escort, fantasist and multiple murderer Andrew Cunanan. While The People v OJ dealt with America’s changing attitudes to race, played out as a pitch-black soap opera, Assassination — written by Child 44 and London Spy’s Tom Rob Smith — deals with issues of fame, class and gay lives in modern America and unfolds at a chilly pace. So, while the performances are uniformly excellent, with Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz both haunting and commanding as Gianni and Donatella, there is a desolate despair to almost every scene, especially those dominated by Glee’s Darren Criss, whose depiction of Cunanan succeeds almost too well at capturing the killer’s fame-obsessed sociopathy. It’s a bleak watch, but stick with it. It gets bleaker.

Andrew Male
Source:  https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-weeks-best-tv-assassination-of-gianni-versace-pets-the-true-cost-dispatches-sunset-boulevard-0zw9hzqv5





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Via BBC Two’s Instagram Story (February 26th, 2018)

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From acsversace-news:


Versace will premiere in the UK Wednesday night on February 28!

Source









edgarramirez25: You can’t miss the #UKpremiere of The Assasination Of Gianni Versace Wednesday Feb 28th on @bbctwo - #acsversace #versace

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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"



This is a London based media site.

Culture Whisper wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story season two

2/27/2018

Where The People v OJ Simpson unpicked the OJ Simpson murder trial against a backdrop of inflamed race-relation tensions in America, The Assassination of Gianni Versace illustrates the trappings of fame and examines issues of homophobia and class tensions in 90s America.

When does The Assassination of Gianni Versace air? America Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace UK airs on Wednesday 28 February 2018. Read on for all the reasons you need to watch this murder most fashionable.

[. . .]

Darren Criss, the preppy songbird of Glee, is out there using his jazz hands for evil. Criss steals the show with his portrayal of serial killer Andrew Cunanan. He is a handsome, charming, bespectacled psychopath; practicing his reactions in the mirror, able to switch personalities in an instant, and curating his backstory to ensure he ‘tell people what they want to hear.’ Despite the shape-shifting personality, Criss conveys the rage and desire for fame that drove Cunanan to his rampage in a performance that exalts Cunanan to the legendary heights he aspired to.

Source:  https://www.culturewhisper.com/r/tv/the_assassination_of_gianni_versace_american_crime_story_season_2_uk_air_date/11115






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This is interesting.  Finn's observation about Darren seems on point; it probably was a survival mechanism for Darren not to stay in character when the director indicated the cameras were not rolling.  Darren had mentioned when he first started reading Maureen Orth's book, before he knew he got the part for sure, he stopped reading after a point because he didn't want to stay in Andrew Cunanan's head space, Andrew's mindset, if it wasn't necessary.  I liked what Finn said, that it was admirable that Darren reverted back to his true self--happy and positive--as soon as he could.  I'm glad Darren did what worked for him--what worked for him to keep himself sane and healthy.  heart  Also:  It's so tragic that 20 years after the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy, Trump proposed the transgender ban.  Thank god several (four) federal district courts ordered the military to keep transgender people in the military and to accept transgender recruits.  (Appellate courts have upheld the district courts' decisions, and the Trump administration did not appeal to the Supreme Court.)  It's also interesting what Finn said about not filming chronologically, although Darren had noted the director did try to film chronologically as much as possible for two episodes (episodes 4 and 5?).  I liked that Finn tore the script apart to try to put the scenes in chronological order.
Too Fab wrote:
What Finn Wittrock Found 'Admirable' About Darren Criss' 'American Crime Story' Transformation

February 28, 2018



Finn Wittrock
gives one of his most powerful performances to date as real life Andrew Cunanan victim Jeff Trail on "The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,"
. . .

The show works backwards.  What was your first day of filming?  And did you guys film chronologically at all?


No. If there was a way to be the most opposite of chronologically, that's the way we shot it. It was literally all over the place. My first day I think was in the airport when we go to pick up Andrew. And then like the next day or the day after I was getting killed and then the day after that I was on the aircraft carrier. I mean it was like all over the place.

I like tore the script apart and I put all the scenes together in chronological order so that I wouldn't get confused. Like that death scene, is over the course of two episodes, so people were like, 'It's scene 96 in episode four, but it's scene three in episode 5' or actually vice versa. And it's like I don't even know what you're talking about. Tell me where to fall.

[. . . ]

There is a lot of talk about Darren because he just loses himself completely into this role. What was it like seeing the light switch on and him becoming Andrew Cunanan?

It’s so cool because he really did, sort of, it was like a mask he threw on and off when he was in it, when he wasn’t. And I think it was maybe in some way the survival mechanism to not stay in it too much, you know. But it was really admirable to kind of watch him be his sort of buoyant energetic self and then sort of drop in at the drop of a dime to this sociopath. But he hates when you say sociopath. Understandably, because he has to play him.

Your character's storyline, Jeff's storyline, most of your solo episode was about 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell.'  It's crazy to think we're still talking about similar bans, like the transgender ban, 20 years later.


. . . when I first read the script I was like, 'Ahh, it's probably a little dated to talk about 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell.' And then like a couple weeks later that whole transgender thing came out.

I know you watched the real "48 Hours" Jeff did to prepare.  What was it like the first time you watched it and kind of getting into Jeff's frame of mind at the time he filmed it?

You don't see his face. He does allow his voice, but like you don't see him. But you can see read so much off of him because he's so composed, he's such a put together, upright young man you know, who really believes in God and country, like really actually does and has a real patriotic feeling inside of him.

But you can also just tell that he's bursting out of his skin, like right underneath of that composure. So that, I mean I just watched it over and over probably for the physical elements of replicating his voice a little bit and that, but that's just also like hearing him and seeing him, you just really could feel by osmosis kind of internal struggle that was going on inside him

"The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story" airs Wednesdays on FX.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://toofab.com/2018/02/28/what-finn-wittrock-found-admirable-about-darren-crisss-american-crime-story-transformation








For the UK viewers:

Via Darren’s Instagram Story (February 28th, 2018)

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From acsversace-news:




Warning!  Spoiler for Episode 6 (tonight's episode):
USA Today wrote:
TV tonight: 'Survivor' tries to 'reverse the curse' in new season

Feb. 28, 2018


The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
FX, 10 ET/PT


As the series continues moving backward in time, we get to know more about spree killer Andrew Cunanan’s (Darren Criss) backstory and the how he became intertwined with the men he would later kill. Tonight’s episode shows Cunanan at a particularly desperate period of his life and depicts the beginnings of his relationship with David Madson (Cody Fern), with whom he becomes obsessed. Criss’ performance remains unsettling, managing to make Cunanan terrifying even in episodes without scenes of violence.
Source:  https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/columnist/criticscorner/2018/02/28/tv-tonight-survivor-tries-reverse-curse-new-season/374658002/








For those in the UK (Warning:  Spoilers about Episode 1!): 
The Telegraph wrote:
What's on TV tonight: The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story and Rent for Sex

February 27, 2018


The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

BBC Two, 9.00pm


Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply.

Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes
Source:  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/tv/0/tv-guide-tv-tonight/amp/?__twitter_impression=true









@tomrobsmith: About to go on @BBCBreakfast to talk about #ACSVersace which airs tonight at 9pm on @BBCTwo









This is very interesting.  According to this article, Versace is the first major TV show that has covered (with great respect) the storyline of a person (in this case, Gianni Versace) being quite ill due to having HIV, but then recovering due to HIV medications, and enjoying a healthy life.  Warning:  Spoilers!
The Body, The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource wrote:
Inside 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace's' Story of High Fashion, Homicide and HIV

February 28, 2018

The show also includes a very powerful HIV storyline. Gianni Versace is revealed as being HIV positive at a time in history when homophobia and AIDS panic were rampant. Not only is Versace portrayed as HIV positive, he is shown to be at times so weak from advanced sickness that he needs help even to walk. Then, in later scenes, he’s shown to be recovered after (presumably) being put on antiretroviral therapy, which became available in the mid-1990s.

After his recovery, Versace decides to use his new lease on life not only to continue creating fashions but also to come out as gay at a time when not many celebrities were brave enough to do so.

“I was sick, but I didn’t die,” he says in Episode 5 of the show. “I have a second chance. It’s a miracle that I’m alive. And yet, I ask myself every day, what have I done to deserve this? Why am I still here? To be afraid? No. I’m alive, and I must use it.”

The Assassination of Gianni Versace might be the first major media movie or television show to present a person sick with advanced HIV infection and then recovered and vibrant due to the miracle of HIV medications. This is an amazing and important landmark for HIV in film/television, and the storyline is told with a lot of respect for those of us living with the virus. By exploring other aspects of the AIDS crisis and its implications in the aftermath of Versace’s murder, the series shows in living color what it was like to be living in the good ol’ bad ol’ '90s.

I had a phone conversation with award-winning executive producer Brad Simpson and screenwriter and author Tom Rob Smith about the production, the creative process, and the decision to use HIV in the storyline.

[. . .]


Simpson: Gianni Versace was one of the few people who were celebrities who were out [as gay] in the 1990s. It was actually shocking to us. We went back to make a list of who was out pre-Ellen [DeGeneres] coming out, and the list is 5, 6, 7 famous people? No fashion designers.

I think this is a show that only Ryan Murphy could get on the air. Because I like to think that we’re incredibly advanced, but the show is deeply gay and touches on things that you haven’t seen dealt with on TV before. There’s a freedom that Ryan’s success gives to allow us to tell a story like this.

Sanchez:
Speaking of things we’ve never seen before, I think it’s the first time I’ve ever seen [on film], from an HIV standpoint, a person with HIV, sick and near death, turning around and becoming miraculously better through medications. What was the process of deciding how to tell that part of the story?

Smith: The reason we told that … it was just very powerful that Versace was very sick in '93-'94 when his symptoms became severe, and it’s debated by the family, so I should put it in as a caveat that the family, they dispute this, but …

Sanchez: I believe in the book it says that, publicly, he had cancer.

Smith:
Yeah, that’s right. I think they say “ear cancer,” and we know that is infamous [as code for HIV]. But we do know that he was very sick in '93-'94, that he was on the brink of death, that is uncontested, and we know that he was refusing to submit to this illness. And that he would walk, still, when he was very sick, from his house in Miami to that news kiosk; he would go with Antonio [his partner], and he’d be so weak that Antonio would have to carry the magazines back. I thought it was a remarkably powerful structure [for the script] to have that walk contrasted with the walk when he’s then fully recovered. And he is then, in '97 [when he’s shot], walking to that newsstand, not needing anyone’s help. He’s full of the joy of life in many ways. This medication gave him a rejuvenation.

And it was a great life force, you know, [Versace] was saying: “I want to live, I have so much more to give. I have so much more work, but also in terms of the people I love, my grandchildren, my family. I’m going to cling on to life for as long as I can.” And this new wave of medication came along, and he was saved.

Simpson: There’s something bittersweet about the fact that he thought he was going to die and had been given this new lease on life. There was this generation of men who thought they had a death sentence and then were slowly realizing maybe they didn’t. He was starting to create again, and right at that moment, his life was taken away.

[. . . ]

Simpson: Ryan, you know, obviously did The Normal Heart. We had a lot of conversation in terms of how to portray the AIDS-related illnesses. We’re adapting Maureen’s book, and this is her position that, you know, [Versace] was positive. We felt that to not portray that would be to play into the stigma that still surrounds HIV to this day.

[. . . ]


Smith: One of the reasons we wanted to do this [show] is to attack the stigma [of having HIV]. This stigma is so wrong, and it’s so corrosive. It still exists today; we’re not just talking about something that is historic. We talk [on the show] about the idea that you could build a company that’s worth billions of dollars, be a fashion icon, and that it could be reduced to having no value simply by the factor of an HIV diagnosis. That isn’t an exaggeration. It seems to me to be a real injustice.

Yet, when you look at Gianni Versace’s words, you know, to me it was code. I can’t declare for sure what he was saying, but when he says in the '90s after he recovers from the most severe symptoms, “I’m not going to live my life filled with regret and shame anymore,” to me, that’s him saying: “I’ve recovered, and I’m not just recovered physically. I’m not going to walk around feeling terrible anymore. I’m going to live; I’m going to love.” And I found that very powerful, and I really wanted to capture that.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.thebody.com/content/80845/inside-the-assassination-of-gianni-versaces-story-.html




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From dcriss-archive:

Promo video for episode 7:


American Crime Story 2x07 Promo “Ascent” (HD) | Source



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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"



I'll post about my thoughts/feelings of Episode 6 tomorrow.  :happy face



From Darren Criss Army:


Digital Spy-UK wrote:
Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story's UK fans stunned by Darren Criss's killer performance

28 February 2018

American Crime Story has finally returned to UK screens, more than two years since it gripped the entire world and won lots of awards with its dramatisation of The People v. O. J. Simpson back in 2016.

[. . . ]

During Wednesday’s UK premiere, Darren Criss’s transformative powerhouse performance as the increasingly-desperate conman-turned-murderer Cunanan was singled out for praise by many BBC Two viewers…

UK people need to tune in to #ACSVersace on @BBCTwo right now. Witness @DarrenCriss giving one of the best performances you'll see on TV all year. pic.twitter.com/Szzz1NM95e
— Melanie (@WaywardFannibal) February 28, 2018

@DarrenCriss is going to win an Emmy for his acting in #ACSVersace. It’s mind-blowingly good pic.twitter.com/Sk9d0CP0ms
— Stanners (@cheesecakebase) February 28, 2018
#ACSVersace Darren Criss is killing it! Super interesting and enticing story, I need more series of American Crime Story!
— Daniel (@ftdanieljames) February 28, 2018

Sorry but #ACSVersace is absolutely outstanding. 100/10 recommend. @DarrenCriss
— Rosie (@rosieedtd) February 28, 2018

Is everyone watching @DarrenCriss do that magic thing he does where just when you think you know about him, he completely changes the game? (Seriously, #ACSVersace @BBCTwo is so completely wonderful. Aesthetically stunning, too).
— Ava Eldred (@ava_eldred) February 28, 2018

#ACSVersace is STUNNING. I totally underestimated Darren Criss...he has magic acting powers
— Erin (@_erinking) February 28, 2018

I am horrified by how much I hate Andrew Cunanan and how much I love @DarrenCriss The two are one = great acting #ACSVersace
— Andrew (@SilverFox0916) February 28, 2018

By the end of the hour, it was clear that The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story has the potential to be appointment television much like its predecessor . . .

[ . . .]
fucking hell this is incredible. More than I dared to dream. #ACSVersace
— Andi (@AndiMcLellan) February 28, 2018

[. . .]
American Crime Story is amazing. The visuals, the acting... I’m hooked. Well done Ryan Murphy, another tv series I’m going to be hooked to  #ACSVersace
— Ellenor (@ellenorsworld) February 28, 2018

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story picks up next Wednesday at 9pm on BBC Two. In the US, the series continues tonight at 10pm on FX.

Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/american-crime-story/news/a851171/american-crime-story-assassination-of-gianni-versace-uk-premiere-reactions/









From dcriss-archive:


inews-UK wrote:
The Assassination of Gianni Versace, BBC 2, review: ‘A new American Psycho’

February 28, 2018

But it’s Darren Criss who steals the show as the real American Psycho (with plenty of nods to the Mary Harron’s film) dissembling and deceiving with alarming ease, dancing to Phil Collins, his eyes flashing behind his preppy glasses.
Source:  https://inews.co.uk/culture/television/assassination-gianni-versace-bbc-2-review-new-american-psycho/










Philip Ellis is a writer and journalist (Teen Vogue, Into).  Declan Cashin-Chalamet (@Tweet_Dec) is a writer (Buzzfeed-UK).   Jo-Anne Rowney is deputy audience growth editor and journalist at Daily Mirror.
















From acsversace-news:



USA Today wrote:
TV tonight: 'Survivor' tries to 'reverse the curse' in new season

Feb. 28, 2018



The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

FX, 10 ET/PT

Criss’ performance remains unsettling, managing to make Cunanan terrifying even in episodes without scenes of violence.
Source:  https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/columnist/criticscorner/2018/02/28/tv-tonight-survivor-tries-reverse-curse-new-season/374658002/











The Custard TV wrote:
REVIEW: American Crime Story: The Assassination of of Gianni Versace is Bold and brazen

28 February 2018

The second series of American Crime Story couldn’t be more different from the first, and considering the overwhelming success that was The People v O.J, a change in tone and direction is a bold move for the historical drama. However, as the subject matter is entirely different, a new tone is more than warranted here. The Assassination of Gianni Versace is bright, bold and much more reminiscent of previous Ryan Murphy series than The People v O.J ever was, but a compelling script courtesy of London Spy’s Tom Rob Smith — and a remarkable leading performance from Darren Criss — keeps the show from going off-track.

[. . . ]

Telling the story from Cunanan’s perspective is a seriously bold move, but one that pays off — largely due to Criss’s award-worthy performance.

[. . . ]

Whether lying about his profession or his income, Cunanan is always playing a role while simultaneously making himself out to be more important (or perhaps more relevant) than he actually is.

[. . . ]

Considering he’s best known for playing adorable warbler Blaine Anderson in Murphy’s mega-hit series Glee, Criss’s performance in Versace is astounding. Bearing a striking resemblance to the real-life Cunanan, Criss is mesmerising and incredibly unsettling here and, despite the character’s heinous actions, the actor somehow manages to humanise Cunanan, making him more than just your average one-dimensional serial killer.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.thecustardtv.com/2018/02/review-american-crime-story.html








The Times-UK wrote:
TV review: The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story; Save Me

March 1, 2018

But it is Darren Criss as Andrew Cunanan, the fantasist serial killer who shot Versace in 1997, who is the show’s tour de force. Criss manages just the right blend of camp charisma and obsessive weirdo mendacity as the contrast is made between the fêted designer’s eye-bleeding wealth and the sociopath’s empty life and wardrobe.
Source:  https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/times2/tv-review-the-assassination-of-gianni-versace-american-crime-story-save-me-jmk82c6ql








Pajaba wrote:
A Little Less Spree Killing, A Little More Coffee and Contemplation

February 28, 2018

Darren Criss is doing an excellent job playing a spiraling narcissistic psychopath, but it’s also driving me straight up a wall watching him.
Source:  http://www.pajiba.com/miscellaneous/5-shows-after-dark-survivor-36th-season-premiere.php





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Critics' Reviews of "The Assassination of Gianni Versace:  American Crime Story"



My thoughts on this week's episode (Episode 6):
Spoiler:


-Yea!  No violence! 


-I assumed there would be no violence in this episode, so I thought to myself, "whew, I can just kick back and not worry about having to jump up and leave the room (or close my eyes behind my hands) when a murder scene occurs!"  But this episode still was a tense episode, where you see Andrew Cunanan emotionally unraveling and falling apart before your eyes. 


-I try to pay attention to language, and I noted in the previous episode (Episode 5), that the word "crazy" and words to that effect, were used frequently by Jeff and David--both when they talked about Andrew between themselves, as well as when they talked to Andrew.  But in this episode, the word "love" is used very frequently, highlighting how desperate Andrew was for love, and how Andrew does not recognize what love really is.

-When his girlfriend (who we saw in an earlier episode, Lizzy?  not sure what her name is) asked Andrew who is he trying to be, he looked down and said in a vulnerable moment, that he wants to be someone that David Madson could love.  But one of the problems is that Andrew doesn't understand what love is (and we're given an indication why that is, at the end part of the episode, where his mother doesn't seem to really care about what Andrew is going through, how she doesn't care how unhappy her son is).  Andrew  thinks he could morph and mold himself into a man who David could love, instead of realizing that David ideally should love Andrew for who Andrew is (well, Andrew doesn't even know who he, himself is, since he changes himself and lies according to the situation and the people he's interacting with). 

--Another mention of "love":  Andrew argues with Norman's wealthy friend, with Andrew declaring he has friends at the party who love him.  Norman's friend replies, that this is because they don't really know Andrew

--Love comes up again, when Andrew recruits poor Jeff into Andrew's scheme to impress David, where Jeff is to show his love for Andrew, by giving Andrew an expensive gift.  Jeff replies he does love Andrew, and that he doesn't understand why the fancy shoes that Andrew also wants Jeff to wear have anything to do with love.  In this scene, you can see how Andrew doesn't even recognize the value of the love that Jeff as a friend has for Andrew, when Jeff sweetly gives his birthday present to Andrew, a book of hiking trails, for hikes they can do together.  And you also see how Andrew doesn't really love Jeff as a friend, or else Andrew wouldn't put Jeff through the pain of pretending to be a Navy officer, when Andrew knew how painful being in and leaving the Navy was for Jeff.


--Regarding "love"--how can another man, such as David, love Andrew romantically, if that man cannot figure out who Andrew is, and love Andrew for who he is, when even Andrew doesn't know who he--Andrew Cunanan--is?  Andrew lies just as much to himself, as he lies to others.  David tries to get to know Andrew.  David, being a kind person, sees how desperately Andrew wants David's love, so David tries to give Andrew several chances to connect with him.  But David cannot form a solid emotional connection with Andrew, because Andrew cannot stop lying.

--In the fancy hotel, Andrew tells David that David is the only man Andrew really has loved.  Both David and the audience are doubtful, given that Andrew and David only had one date before. 

There was a wonderful scene in the fancy hotel when Andrew says he'll answer all of David's questions, and David looks excited.  You see David thinking, that he finally will have a chance to see who Andrew really is, to get to know the real Andrew. 
  I love that moment when the very first question David asks of Andrew, is the one Andrew probably dreads the most, when David asks Andrew about his parents.  I admired Darren's acting at this moment, because you see a moment of panic in Andrew's eyes when David asks about Andrew's parents.  Can you imagine the inner conflict occurring in Andrew at this moment?  For a split-second, Andrew may have considered answering honestly, but only for a split-second. Then comes lie after lie from Andrew's mouth.  I suspect some of Andrew's lies are mixed with truth, but nothing smells true to David and to the audience.  I[size=13]  also continue to love Cody Fern's acting. As Andrew's lies continue, you see in David's eyes, the fading hope of having any real chance of seeing Andrew being open and genuine with David.

--Andrew never wins David's love.  And he loses Jeff's love as a friend when Andrew sends a postcard to Jeff's father, in an attempt to threaten Jeff and retaliate against Jeff because Jeff and David hit it off at Andrew's birthday party.  It doesn't appear that Norman ever loved Andrew, but he seemed fond of Andrew, and wants Andrew to be happy.  Andrew loses Norman's emotional and financial support when Andrew leaves, after Norman refuses to agree to all of unreasonable Andrew's demands.

--As stated earlier, the audience doubts that Andrew ever was shown love by his mother, who is clearly mentally ill and obsessed with appearances and her own delusions about her son.  She completely ignores Andrew's plea for help, when in a rare moment of raw vulnerability, Andrew exposes his deep unhappiness to his mother.

--So there was no violence in this episode.  But this episode was pretty bleak, with Andrew desperate for love, but failing to understand love, and unable to attain David's romantic love or his mother's parental love, and unable to keep a friend's love (Jeff's).  You see Andrew becoming increasingly despondent and progressively unhinged, alienated, lonely, friendless, financially destitute, and addicted to drugs.   You see in the drug-induced dream/nightmare with the figure of Gianni Versace, that Versace says he has something valuable that Andrew does not:  Versace is loved. 
[/size]









From dcriss-archive:


Slash Film wrote:
‘American Crime Story’ Review: ‘Descent’ Begins The Downward Spiral

March 1, 2018

Darren Criss continues to impress with his layered, frantic performance. Some of the best moments of this episode revolve around Criss showing Andrew’s often pathetic desperation – during the party, when he senses David not paying enough attention to him, he attempts to stage a big, flashy scene that doesn’t go according to plan. Watching Criss portray Andrew’s panicked desperation at that moment is remarkable.
Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.slashfilm.com/american-crime-story-descent-review/







James Burgess is an actor, an Emmy nominee, and a film critic.
Radio Times wrote:
Assassination of Gianni Versace viewers praise Darren Criss for his “gripping” performance as Andrew Cunanan

March 1, 2018

The Assassination of Gianni Versace, the follow-up to 2016’s true crime drama The People vs OJ Simpson, debuted on BBC2 last night – and viewers were blown away by former Glee star Darren Criss’ striking performance.

The second series of American Crime Story centres around the killing of the legendary fashion designer, but his alleged murderer, 27-year-old socialite Andrew Cunanan, is the real focal point, as the show’s writers attempt to build a narrative around the crime and Cunanan’s personal life.

Criss is undoubtedly brilliant in the role, creepy, manipulative and alluring all at once. Fans took to Twitter to lavish him with praise after episode one.

#TheAssassinationofGianniVersace proving to me once again how great an actor @DarrenCriss is and it’s only 28 mins in
— Anna (@annactara) February 28, 2018
Opening ep. of Versace @ACSFX: Wow! Gripping, sharp, stylish & extraordinary performance Darren Criss. @MrRPMurphy amazing! #ACSVersace
— James Burgess (@Jamesfilmcritic) March 1, 2018
I know it's only March but I really can't envision anybody this year giving a better TV performance than @DarrenCriss as Andrew Cunanan. Just scary good. #ACSVersace
— Jase (@jaseeeeeeeeeee) March 1, 2018
[. . . ]
Just finished watching the 1st part on BBC iPlayer. I'm hooked, Darren Criss was superb as Andrew Cunanan
— Mark (@CumOnOver99) March 1, 2018
Enjoyed #acsversace but then I look a good old crime drama. Darren Criss is amazing, Penelope I barely recognised (then she spoke) and Ricky Martin was better than I expected
— Jo-Anne Rowney (@JoAnne_Rowney) February 28, 2018


Please visit the site to give the article a number of "clicks."  Source:  http://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2018-03-01/assassination-of-gianni-versace-darren-criss-andrew-cunanan-reviews/






More tweets:






Joe Reid is senior writer/producer at Decider.  David Oliver (@doliver8) writes for US News. Audrey Irvine is senior director of coverage at CNN.   Max Weiss is editor in chief for Baltimore Magazine.  Nick Guillory is a photographer.  Rufio is tech producer ofr Fred + Angi Morning show (1035 Kiss FM).  Allison Hagendorf is global head of rock at Spotify, host of Time Square NYE Times Square host.




















From acsversace-news:

Dailybreak wrote:
"The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story" Episode 6: It Was Never About Versace, Was It?

March 1, 2018

The portrait of Cunanan, a pathologically lying psychopath wrapped in self-loathing and designer clothes, has been much more compelling. I think a lot of that is owed to Darren Criss for laying on the charisma thick like honey. Finn Wittrock and Cody Fern have also sparkled as two of Cunanan’s friends-turned-murder victims, Jeff Trail and David Madson.
Source:  https://www.dailybreak.com/break/american-crime-story-versace-episode-six-descent?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_content=organic








Edge Media Network wrote:
Recapping 'Versace': Episode 6, 'Descent'

Mar. 1, 2018

The show is less an examination of how the fashion designer was murdered but why he was murdered, putting the spotlight on his killer, marvelously portrayed by the dynamic Darren Criss.
Source:  https://www.edgemedianetwork.com/entertainment/television//256282/recapping_versace:_episode_6,_descent









EDIT:
Added a few more items from dcriss-archive:

Indiewire wrote:
Emmy Predictions 2018: Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie

Mar. 1, 2018

Can Darren Criss follow in the footsteps of Courtney B. Vance and Cuba Gooding Jr. in “American Crime Story”?

[. . . ]

Below are IndieWire TV Critic Ben Travers’ predictions for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie (listed in alphabetical order), which will be updated throughout the season. .  .


Predicted Nominees:
1. Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
2. Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose”
3. Michael B. Jordan, “Fahrenheit 451”
4. Antonio Banderas, “Genius: Picasso”
5. Kyle MacLachlan, “Twin Peaks”
6. Al Pacino, “Paterno”












Michael Roffman is president for Consequences of Sound.




















Nancy Josales is a writer for Vanity Fair.













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From dcriss-archive:




acsversace-news:
Episode stills of Darren Criss and Michael Nouri in episode 7 of The Assassination of Gianni Versace | 1 March 2018









americancrimestoryfx: Nothing gold can stay. #ACSVersace @darrencriss

via dcrss-archive










CanalFX_br: Sabe quem está de volta? Hoje tem episódio inédito de #ACSnoFX às 23h 

*Do you know who’s back? Today is an unprecedented episode of #ACSonFX at 11:00 p.m.

via dcriss-archive






















































































haha.







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From Darren Criss Army:



The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story | Inside Season 2: Versace’s Fashion | FX

They weren’t just clothes. They were an expression. The cast and crew explain how the wardrobe helps create a personality.

(Source: youtube.com)











From dcriss-archive:


acsversace-news wrote:


FX Networks and Fox 21 Television Studios invite Television Academy National Active members and a guest to a special advance screening of “Alone,” the final episode of

THE ASSASSINATION OF GIANNI VERSACE:  AMERICAN CRIME STORY

6:00 PM Doors open
7:00 PM Screening and panel discussion

Special guest panelists include:*


  • Darren Criss
  • Edgar Ramírez
  • Ricky Martin
  • Max Greenfield
  • Cody Fern
  • Judith Light
  • Nina Jacobson
  • Brad Simpson
  • Tom Rob Smith
  • Maureen Orth


Moderator:


  • Kristin Baldwin, television critic, Entertainment Weekly


*subject to talent availability
Reception to follow.

Click here to RSVP.

Only Television Academy National Active Members with valid membership cards and their guests will be admitted.

Seating is subject to availability; first come, first served. Admittance is not guaranteed.

WHEN:

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm PDT
WHERE:
Directors Guild of America Theatre
7920 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90046
This event is presented and hosted by FX Networks and Fox 21 Television Studios, not by the Television Academy
Source:  https://www.emmys.com/events/fyc-versace









Darren-edit of the longer YouTube video, above.

“Inside Look: Versace’s Fashion” | Source
*Darren Edit

via dcriss-archive









I haven't had a chance to listen to this yet.
Track: Obsessed (03-02-18)
Darren Criss on Obsessed (March 2nd, 2018)

via dcriss-archive
















Actor Darren Criss visits the SiriusXM Studios on March 2 2018 in New York City









EWlive: TGIF - we’ve got an amazing #obsessed for you today! @HenryGoldblatt is joined by special co-host @KristenGBaldwin to talk about upcoming TV shows! Plus, @DarrenCriss joins us to talk @ACSFX and @michcoll stops by to talk #thebachelor and preview her new show on @SiriusXMStars!









:amused







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*Jeremy*

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Although ACS Versace hasn't become a dramedy, this week's episode has not the uber dark tone of the precedent episodes and I find that nice. I also like the fact that the birthday party has reunited characters that we haven't seen together before (Lizzie, David, Lee). 

Andrew also becomes more likeable and we begin to "get" why he did what he did, although nothing will ever justify his actions.

Poppy

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Jeremy wrote:Although ACS Versace hasn't become a dramedy, this week's episode has not the uber dark tone of the precedent episodes and I find that nice. I also like the fact that the birthday party has reunited characters that we haven't seen together before (Lizzie, David, Lee). 

Andrew also becomes more likeable and we begin to "get" why he did what he did, although nothing will ever justify his actions.


There were some lighter moments in this episode, which I enjoyed.  I enjoyed the verbal fight between Andrew and Norman's friend (although that verbal battle did result in my feeling sympathy for Norman, for losing a beloved, long-time partner to AIDS).  I also enjoyed the moments with Lizzie.  She brings brightness when she appears in the show.  She seemed like a close friend.  It's too bad Andrew didn't go to her for help, but we know how Andrew refused to ask for help.

It was striking that we saw so many of the cast of characters in one scene.   It was interesting that the birthday party scene was written in a way to explore how panicked Andrew felt when his scheme to win over David wasn't going as planned (even though he had recruited Jeff to help him), how anxious Andrew became when he saw Jeff and David getting along, even with Jeff offering a place for David to sleep over.  Lee Miglin's presence also seemed to increase Andrew's anxiety, because presumably Andrew had some type of relationship with Lee, which Andrew obviously did not want David to see.  But I found it was sad to see that group photo being taken, because all of those in the photo, except Norman, were murdered. 

I had forgotten to mention that the more I got to see and know Jeff Trail, the more my admiration for Jeff grew.  And the more scenes with Jeff occurred, the more I became a fan of how Finn Wittrock played Jeff:  As a solid, kind, ethical, dependable, down-to-earth person and good friend.   It was also understandable how angry he was when Andrew tried to out him to Jeff's own father.

Andrew was definitely more likeable than in the episodes when he committed murder, but you still saw how he used and manipulated people and lacked empathy for others.  We did see how vulnerable he was, in terms of how he was very needy and desperate for love.  He was more likeable in the scene with Lizzie, where he showed vulnerability when he talked about how David represented a future for Andrew, a home, a chance for happiness.  I felt the most sympathy for him in the scenes with his mother.   I had a friend who had a parent who had mental illness.  It was a struggle for my friend, in terms of her self-esteem.  Luckily for her, her siblings supported her (and she supported them), she had good friends, and the other parent tried as much as possible.  It's hard to imagine how that would affect a child growing up.  It also was interesting to see more emphasis in this episode of Andrew's drug addiction.










From Darren Criss Army:



I am a fan of this friendship.  :happy face



March 3, 2018










March 3, 2018 https://instagram.com/p/Bf30uJQBaEo/










Darren Criss & Edgar Ramirez


darrencriss: While we didn’t spent a lot of time together at work, we certainly made up for it off-duty. Lotta love and laughs with my new brutha @edgarramirez25

Via Darren’s IG, Mar 3 2018








From dcriss-archive:










New stills from episode 6 of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story (March 3rd, 2018) | Source





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